Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    asad hussain is offline Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    433
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Fix my errs, please.

    After spending weeks on the answers, I feel they are not quite right, and don’t sparkle. I am not sure if grammar, sentence structure, flow, punctuation, mood and tense are presented in a manner that makes sense. I have put parenthesis where confusion is arising. Could you please do the checking, and make sure that the flow of readability of the answers is correct, and the style is consistent?


    Your help will be highly appreciated.


    1. What are the children doing?
    They are playing.

    2. What is the question that is disturbing the poet?
    What would life be like without the innocence of children?

    3. How has the question been answered?
    It has been answered by the sound of the soft and sweet voices of the children.

    4. What does the poet mean by saying that the children open the windows that look to the east?
    It's children that make the Sun rise and show its brightness to the world.

    5. To what does the poet compare the thoughts?
    He compares the thoughts to singing swallows.

    6. Why does he compare them so?
    He compares them because children's thoughts are as innocent and nonchalant as the singing birds, which soar carelessly in the sky at dawn and present a beautiful picture of tranquility.

    7. How can the birds and the sunshine be in the hearts of the children? What does the poet mean?
    He means children are generally carefree, like the birds which glide high in the sky, away from the cares in the world, crooning soft and mellow tunes. Children always speak the truth, and their hearts are as pure and radiant as the Sunshine.

    8. The poet says that the children are thinking of the brooks while he is thinking of autumn. What does this mean?
    The poet says so, because he has grown old and feeble, and his life is about to end like a plant that gets dried out in Autumn, while the children are young, energetic and lively like running brooks.

    9. Is the poet using the word autumn for old age?
    Yes, he is using it to describe the period of late maturity.

    10. What other words does the poet use to show the coming of old age upon him?
    First fall of the snow

    11. How are the children different from the poet?
    The children differ from the poet in several features. Their thoughts are as innocent and nonchalant as the singing birds, which glide carelessly in the sky at dawn, crooning soft and mellow tunes. In their hearts "are the birds and the sunshine”, and in their thoughts "the brooklet's flow”, while the poet is gripped by various troubles, and in his heart and thoughts “is the wind of Autumn, and the first fall of the snow.” And most importantly, he has grown old and fragile, it has taken almost all his lifetime to make his fortune, whereas the children are bouncy and lively, and it’s just the beginning of their journey.

    12. What question does the poet ask?
    What would life be like without the children and their innocence?

    13. In the third and fourth lines of the 4th stanza, the poet says if there were no children, we would fear the desert behind us, and more than that we would fear the dark in front of us. What do the desert and the dark mean?
    The? desert is the past, and? the? dark is? the future. The desert in the poem actually refers to a world which would be lifeless and barren of any gaiety and cheerfulness without children, and the dark signifies an alarm of death.

    14. What would happen to the trees if there were no leaves?
    They would harden into woods.

    15. What would happen to us, if there were no children?
    We would have no hope; life would be depressing and pointless.

    16. Why does the poet ask the children to come to him?
    He calls them to whisper to him.

    17. What songs does the poet wish to be whispered in the ear?
    The poet wants the children to whisper to him what the birds and winds are singing.

    18. To what does the poet compare children?
    He compares them to the? ballads and the?poems.

    19. How can the children be like the ballads and the poems?
    They can be like the ballads and the poems, because they are full of emotions, feelings, energy and music.

    20. The poet calls the children living and the rest all dead. Why does he say this?
    He says this, because we have lost our innocence.

    21. The grown up people have wisdom and books. What do the children have?
    They have innocence, emotions of love and affection, pleasure and self-contentment.
    Last edited by asad hussain; 05-Mar-2007 at 02:13.

  2. #2
    asad hussain is offline Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    433
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Fix my errs, please.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    260
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Fix my errs, please.

    3. "How is the question answered?" means "What is the answer to the question?" As the question is about life without children, the answer is

    'We should dread the desert behind us
    Worse than the dark before.'

    4. You are on the right path. The sun rises in the East, so East symbolises a new day, newness, and birth.

    7. Again, you are on the right path. Birds and sunshine come with the spring, so they symbolise youth, growth, and as a result an excitement where everyday brings something new.

    9. Autumn does indeed represent old age, because Winter represents the cold of death.

    10. he also refers to the wind of Autumn. Autumn is traditionally a windy season, and this wind blows the leaves off the trees. He uses this image to contrast with the later mention of

    'What the leaves are to the forest,
    With light and air for food,'

    11. You might want to mention

    'For what are all our contrivings,
    And the wisdom of our books,
    When compared with your caresses,
    And the gladness of your looks?'

    Adults are weighed down with learning, business, finances, rules, politics etc. (contrivings and books), while children are playful, happy, and don't judge others.

    You could also use this for number 12.

    13. The desert behind represents barrenness, no life, no activity. If there are no children behind, then that particular family home is empty and quiet, and that particular family or bloodline will die - it becomes a desert.

    The dark before is death. What he means by this is that dying with no children is worse than dying knowing you have children to continue the family.

    18. Ballads and poems don't need 'the' in this case. It is referring to ballads and poems in general.

    20. Children are better because they are alive and interactive - 'living poems'. Ballads and poems are not alive so he describes them as dead to contrast with the life in children.


    Hope it helps!

  4. #4
    asad hussain is offline Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    433
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Fix my errs, please.

    Many many thanks for your suggestions and comments, Andrew. I have again had a go to make the answers sparkle sticking to your suggestions and comments. But I am unsure my grammar, punctuation, style, mood, and smoothness. I am re-submitting them down here. Could you please once again go through the answers, and correct my blunders?

    I know your time is very expensive, and I really appreciate you for taking some out for me.

    Thanks a lot once again.


    1. What are the children doing?
    They are playing.

    2. What is the question that is disturbing the poet?
    What would life be like without the innocence of children?

    3. How has the question been answered?
    It has been answered by the sound of the soft and sweet voices of the children.As the question is about life without children, the answer is

    'We should dread the desert behind us
    Worse than the dark before.'


    4. What does the poet mean by saying that the children open the windows that look to the east?
    The Sun rises in the East, so East symbolizes a new day, newness, and birth. And It's children that make the Sun rise and show its brightness to the world.

    5. To what does the poet compare the thoughts?
    He compares the thoughts to singing swallows.

    6. Why does he compare them so?
    He compares them because children's thoughts are as innocent and nonchalant as the singing birds, which soar carelessly in the sky at dawn and present a beautiful picture of tranquility.
    OR?
    He compares the? children's thoughts to singing birds, because they are as innocent and nonchalant as the birds, which soar carelessly in the sky at dawn and present a beautiful picture of tranquility.


    Which construction do I use?

    7. How can the birds and the sunshine be in the hearts of the children? What does the poet mean?
    Birds and sunshine come with the spring, so they symbolize youth, growth, and as a result an excitement where everyday brings something new. Children always seem to be excited, and their thoughts are generally carefree, like the birds which glide high in the sky, away from the cares in the world, uttering/singing? soft and mellow tunes. Children always speak the truth, and their hearts are as pure and radiant as the Sunshine.

    8. The poet says that the children are thinking of the brooks while he is thinking of autumn. What does this mean?
    He says so, because he has grown old and feeble, and is in the Autumn of his life, while the children are energetic and lively like running brooks.

    9. Is the poet using the word autumn for old age?
    Yes, he is using it to describe the period of late maturity. And Autumn does indeed represent old age, because Winter represents the cold of death.

    10. What other words does the poet use to show the coming of old age upon him?
    Except for the word Autumn, he uses the phrase “the first fall of the snow” to show the coming old age upon him. He also refers to the wind of Autumn. Autumn is traditionally a windy season, and this wind blows the leaves off the trees. He uses this image to contrast with the later mention of


    'What the leaves are to the forest,
    With light and air for food,'



    11. How are the children different from the poet?
    The children differ from the poet in several features. Their thoughts are as innocent and nonchalant as the singing birds, which glide carelessly in the sky at dawn, uttering/singing? soft and mellow tunes. In their hearts "are the birds and the sunshine”, and in their thoughts "the brooklet's flow”, which imply that they are in the springs of their lives. , while the poet is gripped by various troubles, and in his heart and thoughts “is the wind of Autumn, and the first fall of the snow.”, which suggest that he has grown old and fragile, and is in the autumn of his life. Moreover Adults are weighed down with learning, business, finances, rules, politics etc. (contrivings and books), while children are playful, happy, and don't judge others.

    12. What question does the poet ask?
    What would life be like without the children and their innocence?

    13. In the third and fourth lines of the 4th stanza, the poet says if there were no children, we would fear the desert behind us, and more than that we would fear the dark in front of us. What do the desert and the dark mean?
    The desert behind represents barrenness, no life, no activity. If there are no children behind, then that particular family home is empty and quiet, and that particular family or bloodline will die - it becomes a desert.

    The dark before is death. What he means by this is that dying with no children is worse than dying knowing you have children to continue the family.

    14. What would happen to the trees if there were no leaves?
    They wouldn’t look as beautiful and lively as they look with leaves, and hence would harden into woods.

    15. What would happen to us, if there were no children?
    We would have no hope; life would be depressing and pointless.

    16. Why does the poet ask the children to come to him?
    He calls them to whisper to him.

    17. What songs does the poet wish to be whispered in the ear?
    The poet wants to the children to whisper to him what the birds and winds are singing.

    18. To what does the poet compare children?
    He compares them to ballads and poems.

    19. How can the children be like the ballads and the poems?
    They can be like the ballads and the poems, because they are full of emotions, feelings, energy and music.

    20. The poet calls the children living and the rest all dead. Why does he say this?
    Children are better because they are alive and interactive - 'living poems'. Ballads and poems are not alive, so he describes them as dead to contrast with the life in children.

    21. The grown up people have wisdom and books. What do the children have?
    They have innocence, emotions of love and affection, pleasure, and self-contentment.
    Last edited by asad hussain; 06-Mar-2007 at 02:24.

  5. #5
    asad hussain is offline Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    433
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Fix my errs, please.

    Help please!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •