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Thread: idioms

  1. #1
    idiomsbuster Guest

    Default idioms

    can you help me pls?
    whats the meaning of bound to space?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: idioms

    Hi,
    Could you provide some context, at least the sentence?

  3. #3
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: idioms

    Quote Originally Posted by idiomsbuster View Post
    can you help me pls?
    whats the meaning of bound to space?
    Whatever the context, this sounds rather odd - unless 'bound to' means 'certain to', and 'space' is a verb:

    If a woman has several children, she is bound to space them out.

    Are you sure you don't mean 'bound for' space?

    b

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    Default Re: idioms

    bound to space
    I have found this expression in God, by Abd-ru-shin
    The cleavage occurred when humanity gave preference to worldly matters, which are unconditionally bound to space and time. This is alien to the nature of God, and therefore makes it impossible to comprehend Him.
    and in
    text
    These questions illustrate the fact that ”location”, as a state of affairs reduced to the object world of the real, can only to a limited extent be capable of covering key aspects of the wealth of meaning of places as these are not necessarily bound to space (or to a scale) – whereas they are most certainly bound to a subject and, in sociology, to communications (Luhmann).
    and
    Untitled Document
    Its purpose is to overcome the boundary of space or instinct of setting a system of co-ordinates which remains in the virtual, since we are permanently bound to space. The logical conclusion is that the net resembles a spider’s web into which we get ensnared despite our likes or dislikes.
    Seems like 'we are bound to space' means that 'we are closely connected with places/space/location/ an area'

    What do you think?

  5. #5
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: idioms

    Quote Originally Posted by queenbu View Post
    bound to space
    I have found this expression in God, by Abd-ru-shin
    The cleavage occurred when humanity gave preference to worldly matters, which are unconditionally bound to space and time. This is alien to the nature of God, and therefore makes it impossible to comprehend Him.
    and in
    text
    These questions illustrate the fact that ”location”, as a state of affairs reduced to the object world of the real, can only to a limited extent be capable of covering key aspects of the wealth of meaning of places as these are not necessarily bound to space (or to a scale) – whereas they are most certainly bound to a subject and, in sociology, to communications (Luhmann).
    and
    Untitled Document
    Its purpose is to overcome the boundary of space or instinct of setting a system of co-ordinates which remains in the virtual, since we are permanently bound to space. The logical conclusion is that the net resembles a spider’s web into which we get ensnared despite our likes or dislikes.
    Seems like 'we are bound to space' means that 'we are closely connected with places/space/location/ an area'
    What do you think?
    Aha - I didn't think of that sort of "space". In all those cases, 'bound to space" means 'restricted/confined to the space/time continuum'; in the first case, mankind is resticted to a spatio-temporal existence* and God (as defined by most religions) isn't.

    b
    *It's interesting that the words 'finite/infinite' are about boundaries (Latin finis, 'end').

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