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  1. #1
    lukre is offline Member
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    Default "I wasn't having it"

    "They hired someone younger. The end of story. I wasn't having it."

    What does the last sentence mean? That he wasn't good enough for them or?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: "I wasn't having it"

    I wasn't having the job, I guess.

  3. #3
    lukre is offline Member
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    Default Re: "I wasn't having it"

    No, they fired him and hired somebody new, younger.
    And then he says - I just wasn't having it.

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    Default Re: "I wasn't having it"

    He couldn't accept it?

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    Default Re: "I wasn't having it"

    i think he wasnt able to get the job

  6. #6
    lukre is offline Member
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    Default Re: "I wasn't having it"

    You mean -e.g. he wasn't able to get clients for that firm so they fired him?
    To me it just seems that since they replaced him with someone younger, he just wasn't the right person for them any more - he wasn't having it - he wasn't the one for that job?

  7. #7
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    Default Re: "I wasn't having it"

    it is not clear the sntence u wrote above that he was working there before or not.i understood from that sentence is that he applied for the jop and he was not as qualified as the young person(he/she applied at the same time)so the younger one got the job.
    if u want to clear explanation about tis sentence plz write the whole passage.

  8. #8
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: "I wasn't having it"

    Quote Originally Posted by lukre View Post
    "They hired someone younger. The end of story. I wasn't having it."

    What does the last sentence mean? That he wasn't good enough for them or?

    It depends on the context. 'The end of story' sounds odd. If he was saying 'They hired someone younger, and were not prepared to enter into any kind of appeal procedure' then the normal way to say it would be 'They hired someone younger - end of story.' That is, the 'story' is "They hired someone younger." No more's to be said.

    'I wasn't having it' is ambiguous. The it could refer to 'the job' - assuming that those words appeared in the previous context. The second possible meaning depends on the idiomatic sense of 'not having it' - referring to intolerable behaviour: 'Everyone's shouting out at once, and I can't hear what anyone's saying. I'm not having it. If you want to make a comment, put your hand up.'

    With this sense, your text has a different meaning: 'They hired a younger man, and I found their behaviour intolerable. So...'. If the rest of the text has the speaker resigning or threatening to resign, this is probably the meaning. But as 'The end of story' sounds rather stilted, maybe the speaker isn't a native. So maybe he's using 'I wasn't having it' in the non-idiomatic sense (because he's not aware of the ambiguity).

    b

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