Results 1 to 4 of 4

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 2
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    "is not subject to" vs "is not subjected to" vs "was not subjected to"

    Hi

    May I know what are the differences for

    "is not subject to"
    "is not subjected to"
    "was not subjected to"

    and when should each case to be used?

    I have this question when I saw a sentence "... is not subjected to..."
    I always think that the verb after "not" is always in its basic form.
    After a search in this forum, I learned that "not" do not determine the tense of the verb.
    A quick look in the dictionary, one of the explanation is written as "... is subject to..."

    So I am confused. When should I put a -ed to the verb(subject)? Is "... is not subjected to..." equivalent to the past tense? Then how about "... was not subjected to... "

    Thanks a million

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2006
    • Posts: 431
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: "is not subject to" vs "is not subjected to" vs "was not subjected to"

    Quote Originally Posted by sukide View Post
    Hi

    May I know what are the differences for

    "is not subject to"
    "is not subjected to"
    "was not subjected to"

    and when should each case to be used?

    I have this question when I saw a sentence "... is not subjected to..."
    I always think that the verb after "not" is always in its basic form.
    After a search in this forum, I learned that "not" do not determine the tense of the verb.
    A quick look in the dictionary, one of the explanation is written as "... is subject to..."

    So I am confused. When should I put a -ed to the verb(subject)? Is "... is not subjected to..." equivalent to the past tense? Then how about "... was not subjected to... "

    Thanks a million
    "Subject to" means depending on something else, in which "subject" is an adjective. In "Subjected to" , "subjected" is a past participle and is from the verb "subject", which implies being forced to experience something. For example, products are subjected to all kinds of testing. (Maybe the laws subject the products to testing, so the products are subjected to testing.)

    Subject to is different. For example, The agreement should be carried out, subject to the approval of the government, in which "subject to" means depending on. Hope this helps.

  1. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 15,854
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: "is not subject to" vs "is not subjected to" vs "was not subjected to"

    Quote Originally Posted by ian2 View Post
    "Subject to" means depending on something else, in which "subject" is an adjective. In "Subjected to" , "subjected" is a past participle and is from the verb "subject", which implies being forced to experience something. For example, products are subjected to all kinds of testing. (Maybe the laws subject the products to testing, so the products are subjected to testing.)

    Subject to is different. For example, The agreement should be carried out, subject to the approval of the government, in which "subject to" means depending on. Hope this helps.


    I hate those station announcements that say 'services may be subject to delay', when what they mean is 'services are subject to delay, [and any particular train may be subjected to delay (i.e. delayed).]

    b


    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 2
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: "is not subject to" vs "is not subjected to" vs "was not subjected to"

    Thanks alot for the help =)

Similar Threads

  1. Subject of a verb
    By Anonymous in forum Linguistics
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 14-Oct-2003, 08:10

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •