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  1. #11
    Soup's Avatar
    Soup is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: British or American english

    Quote Originally Posted by nyggus View Post
    Older means longer here, like with earthworms?
    Confused...

  2. #12
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    Default Re: British or American english

    Hey Soup, this is what Nyggus means.

    Earthworms become longer as they grow older.
    Younger earthworms are shorter.

    Just like in British English, it longer because
    they are the proponents of the English language. (eg. favour)

    American English is shorter as they are younger. (eg. favor)

  3. #13
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    Default Re: British or American english

    Again, that is only true with words concerned with the spelling.

    We have the words:
    British American
    Mince Chopped Beef
    Torch Flashlight
    Pavement Sidewalk

    The British words here are shorter, and seeing the American words being more elaborate shows that British English is the original.

  4. #14
    Ouisch's Avatar
    Ouisch is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: British or American english

    Quote Originally Posted by broadway121004 View Post
    Again, that is only true with words concerned with the spelling.

    We have the words:
    British American
    Mince Chopped Beef
    Torch Flashlight
    Pavement Sidewalk

    The British words here are shorter, and seeing the American words being more elaborate shows that British English is the original.
    But British English isn't always the original....for example, the flashlight was invented in the United States in 1902, so the American English word for it came first. Elisha Otis, an American, demonstrated the first working elevator in 1853 and patented it in 1861, so again, the AmE word entered the language first. The British just gave their own names to these devices. Even within the US this happens - the sandwich that we call a "submarine" in my area is called a "hoagie" on the East Coast, a "hero" in New York, a "grinder" in New England, and a "po' boy" in parts of the South. Same sandwich, different names depending upon where you live.

  5. #15
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    Default Re: British or American english

    Thanks for the clarification Ouisch!

  6. #16
    Fleur de mort Guest

    Default Re: British or American english

    British English is easier than American accent.
    Last edited by Fleur de mort; 16-Sep-2007 at 06:52.

  7. #17
    nyggus is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: British or American english

    Quote Originally Posted by Fleur de mort View Post
    British English is easier than American accent.
    Say: for you. In Canada I found no problem to understand people, but in the UK... oh yes, there were guys I wasn't able to understand almost at all. So it depends on which accept you're learning and trying to use, and which accent you have had a possibility to listen to more. For me this is the American accent that is easier to understand.

  8. #18
    Fleur de mort Guest

    Default Re: British or American english

    When I was a child I've studied British English. My English friends say: Your English is British. It's very clear and beautiful. Also I love hear this dialect from some men. I know it's not a poetry section but I really associate between them. American accent is a bit soft, pampered and cottony. And I don't like a softness at all.

  9. #19
    Fleur de mort Guest

    Default Re: British or American english

    American speakers have eaten words I can't understand anything.
    I remember my British teacher when she asked me: What is your hobbies?
    haha I said: I love belly dance. Then she said: OOOOOOOh yyyyoou LLuuuuvve Baaallley dOOOnce.
    They say: Donce not dance.
    I liked it. I feel I'm in love.

  10. #20
    LwyrFirat is offline Member
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    Default Re: British or American english

    I think, it depends on the age group of people as well. For example, when I listened to young British people, especially in pubs, clubs, I had big difficulties to understand them. But it never happened when I listened to older British ladies. They speak very slowly, clearly and of course without slang.

    Personally I think,
    ArE=The most clear one
    BrE=The most euphonic one
    Scottish:The most charismatic one :) (remember Desmond from "lost")

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