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Thread: a tank top

  1. #1
    angliholic's Avatar
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    Smile a tank top

    Shorts and a tank top would probably fit in more at the beach. Nest time, try to dress more formally and you'll fit in just fine.


    A tank top and vest are translated into the same term in my mother tongue, and I wonder they refer to the same thing to you. Thanks.

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    Default Re: a tank top

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    Shorts and a tank top would probably fit in more at the beach. Nest time, try to dress more formally and you'll fit in just fine.


    A tank top and vest are translated into the same term in my mother tongue, and I wonder they refer to the same thing to you. Thanks.
    Shorts (in BE) are just short trousers. In AmE, they're what we call 'underpants' (or in some cases 'boxer shorts' - but never just 'shorts).

    A tank-top would be quite a strange thing to wear on a beach (except on a coldish beach) - it's an item of knitwear. It's discussed in this thread: http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/as...light=tank-top

    b

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    Default Re: a tank top

    A tank top is not necessarily knit wear, often it is made of the same material as a T-shirt. It is very common beachwear in the US. Also, we would not use the words "vest" and "tank top" interchangeably in AmE.

    We call short trousers "shorts" in AmE. Some men (particularly older men) often refer to their underwear as "shorts," but younger guys would usually say "boxers." There are different types of shorts, such as Bermuda shorts, Daisy Dukes, etc.

    Photos of tank tops and shorts

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    Default Re: a tank top

    This is the tank top I know and the one BobK is referring to.
    http://www.ethknits.co.uk/Rowan/Rowa...F-STRIPE-C.jpg

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    Default Re: a tank top

    In AmE, "shorts" mean short pants. They generally mean outerwear, but may mean men's underwear depending upon the context. A "tank top" in AmE is a "vest" in BrE. Here is an interesting web site explaining "tank top". Sleeveless shirt - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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    Default Re: a tank top

    Quote Originally Posted by queenbu View Post
    This is the tank top I know and the one BobK is referring to.
    http://www.ethknits.co.uk/Rowan/Rowa...F-STRIPE-C.jpg
    Even though those garments in the photo are in the shape of what we'd called a tank top, they are still what we would call a "vest."

    A true tank would not be knitted like that, and is not usually worn over another shirt. A sleeveless top worn over another shirt is a "vest" in AmE.

    This is a vest, as is this (called a "waistcoat" in BrE). This is a tank top, and is the casual garment mentioned in the original post that might be too casual to wear in some places.

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    Default Re: a tank top

    tank top (tank tops)

    1. N-COUNT
    A tanktop is a knitted piece of clothing that covers the upper part of your body and has no sleeves.[ BRIT ]

    2. N-COUNT
    A tanktop is a soft cotton shirt with no sleeves, collar, or buttons.[ AM ]



    vest

    1 N-COUNT in AM, use undershirt A vest is a piece of underwear which you can wear on the top half of your body in order to keep warm. [[[ BRIT ,]]] 2 N-COUNT in BRIT, use waistcoat A vest is a sleeveless piece of clothing with buttons which people usually wear over a shirt

    [from Collins Cobuild Dictionary]
    Last edited by siruss; 06-Apr-2007 at 18:57.

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    Default Re: a tank top

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    Even though those garments in the photo are in the shape of what we'd called a tank top, they are still what we would call a "vest."

    A true tank would not be knitted like that, and is not usually worn over another shirt. A sleeveless top worn over another shirt is a "vest" in AmE.

    This is a vest, as is this (called a "waistcoat" in BrE). This is a tank top, and is the casual garment mentioned in the original post that might be too casual to wear in some places.
    Nowadays the French word 'gilet' is often used instead of 'waistcoat'.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: a tank top

    Moreover, to pursue the excursus on 'waistcoat', some people in the UK still use the old pronunciation - 'weskit'.

    b

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