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    #1

    Stopping by woods on a snowy evening

    Could someone please have a look at the answers for grammar and interpretation mistakes?

    After spending hours, days, even weeks on them I feel they are not quite right, and donít sparkle. I am not sure if grammar, sentence structure, flow, punctuation, mood and tense are presented in a manner that makes sense. Could you please do the checking, and make sure that the flow of readability of the answers is correct, and the style is consistent?


    Here's the poem. The questions and their answers follow.

    Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening

    Whose woods these are I think I know.
    His house is in the village though;
    He will not see me stopping here
    To watch his woods fill up with snow.

    My little horse must think it queer
    To stop without a farmhouse near
    Between the woods and frozen lake
    The darkest evening of the year.

    He gives his harness bells a shake
    To ask if there is some mistake.
    The only other sound's the sweep
    Of easy wind and downy flake.

    The woods are lovely, dark and deep.
    But I have promises to keep,
    And miles to go before I sleep,
    And miles to go before I sleep.

    Stanza # 03 (The questions below are related to Stanza No. 3)

    What are harness bells?
    Harness bells are attached to the harness. They are small round metal bells that jingle when the horse is moving.

    Why does the horse shake his harness bells?
    The horse understands that this isnít the final destination, that they have to press on, even if the narrator has momentarily forgotten in the tranquility. He understands that if they stay there they will die from the cold. So he shakes his harness bells to remind the narrator of his obligations, and to urge him to continue.

    What other sounds alone can be heard where the poet is standing?
    Besides the sound of shaking of the harness bells, the sounds ďof easy wind and downy flakeĒ alone can be heard where the poet is standing.

    Why does the poet mention these sounds?
    The poet mentions the sounds to create an auditory image, and to provide contrast to the tranquility of the scene. The descriptions of the sounds provide a little insight to his mindset and position. He is so still that he can hear the soft fall of the downy flakes, and the movement of the easy wind. This also shows a great calm and patience that he must possess.

    __________________________________________________ _______________________________________
    Last edited by asad hussain; 11-Apr-2007 at 21:49.


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    #2

    Re: Stopping by woods on a snowy evening

    Would anyone mind helping me??

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    #3

    Re: Stopping by woods on a snowy evening

    I'm not sure about 'auditory image'.


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    #4

    Re: Stopping by woods on a snowy evening

    Dear Tdol,
    Many many many thanks for dropping in and giving me a hand.

    I came across the phrase (auditory image) on a site ( Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening Study Guide by Robert Frost: Poem Summary ).

    Here are the lines for your convenience;

    Lines 9-12:
    Although this stanza begins with an auditory image, the shaking of the harness bells, the greater emphasis of the stanza is on silence. Although the speaker can hear the "easy wind.....

    By the way, is the rest fine?

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    #5

    Re: Stopping by woods on a snowy evening

    Hmm- can't say I like the phrase much. The rest seems fine. I would just say that he adds an element/dimension of sound.
    Last edited by Tdol; 13-Apr-2007 at 10:43.


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    #6

    Re: Stopping by woods on a snowy evening

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    Hmm- can't say I like the phrase much. The rest seems fine. I would just say that he adds an element/dimension of sound.
    Oh! Many thanks for the reply.

    Like this --->> He mentions the sounds to add an element of sound, and to provide....


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    #7

    Re: Stopping by woods on a snowy evening

    Can someone tell me how to use the sentence Tdol has suggested me in the answer?

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    #8

    Re: Stopping by woods on a snowy evening

    That works for me.

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