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  1. #1
    Agnes is offline Member
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    Default 'Aboard' and 'on board'

    When are the two used?Do they mean the same? Flight hostesses and pilots use either, as i have noticed. Is there any difference? And if there is, what is the difference? " Welcome on board!" or " Welcome aboard!"???

  2. #2
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    Default Re: 'Aboard' and 'on board'

    Quote Originally Posted by Agnes View Post
    When are the two used?Do they mean the same? Flight hostesses and pilots use either, as i have noticed. Is there any difference? And if there is, what is the difference? " Welcome on board!" or " Welcome aboard!"???
    "board" is a noun
    "aboard" is an adverb
    you can look up dictionary from the internet.
    maybe you can find more information.

  3. #3
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: 'Aboard' and 'on board'

    Quote Originally Posted by Agnes View Post
    When are the two used?Do they mean the same? Flight hostesses and pilots use either, as i have noticed. Is there any difference? And if there is, what is the difference? " Welcome on board!" or " Welcome aboard!"???
    No big difference in usage (in this context).

    But the adverb aboard (without reference to the vehicle boarded) has a sense of direction - you welcome someone aboard, but you don't 'have drinks aboard'* (although you do have drinks 'aboard the plane'). Similarly, 'Is there a doctor on board?' or 'Was there a doctor aboard the plane?'

    In brochures, 'on board' (usually an adverbial phrase) can be used as an adjectival phrase as well: 'There is an extensive on board bar.'

    * At least, it sounds odd to me.

    b

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