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  1. #1
    jiang is offline Key Member
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    Default hear of and hear about, etc.

    Dear teachers,
    I have five questions to ask:

    No.1
    Have you _____ ever_______ someone who knows some Afrikaans?

    a. for God's sake; heard of b. for goodness' sake; heard about
    The key is 'a'. No problem. But I think 'b' is also correct. Is that right?

    No.2
    ___________ they had no others in my size so I left with gift.

    a. Disappointedly b. Unfortunately
    The key is 'b'. My questions are: What's wrong with 'a'? And what's the difference between 'disappointedly' and 'disappintingly'?

    No.3
    They looked at me as if I were trying to ________ with a particularly cunning trick.

    a. break free b. get away c. run off

    The key is 'b'. But I think 'a' and 'c' are also correct. Is that right?

    No.4

    I continued to _________ that I was not a shop-lifter.
    a. persist b. protest
    The key is 'b'. If I use 'a' it can only be used after quotation marks. Is that right? I mean " I am not a shop-lifter', I persisted" is correct. If I change it into an indirect speech then I can't choose 'a'. Is that right?

    No.5
    I have difficulty understanding the following sentence.
    But even the most enjoyable visions of managers on their hands and knees couldn't really have comforted me.

    What does ' on their hands and knees' mean? Could you please kindly explain it to me?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

  2. #2
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    Default Re: hear of and hear about, etc.

    No.1
    Traditional grammar: hear about something; hear of someone.
    Ex: Heard about Max's vacation
    Ex: Heard of Max

    No.2
    I left disappointed with a gift, which was not what I wanted.

    No.3
    Break free means to escape or to get out of, run off means just that, to run, whereas get away with means to accomplish something without detection.

    No.4
    Potest something and persist in doing something. <phrasal verb>

    No.5
    Managers begging on their hands and knees.

    All the best.

  3. #3
    jiang is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: hear of and hear about, etc.

    &
    Thank you very much for your explanation. I understand No.2 and No.4.
    I have to ask more questions:
    No.1
    In my dictionary I can find examples:
    I have never heard about him.
    Did you hear about the party?
    I never heard of such a thing!
    It seems the two phrases are interchangeable. That's why I ask the question.
    No.3
    Do you think only 'get out of ' is correct? If the others can mean 'escape' but to different degree then does it mean all are correct?
    No.4
    Does 'on their hands and knees' mean they kneel on the floor?

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    No.1
    Traditional grammar: hear about something; hear of someone.
    Ex: Heard about Max's vacation
    Ex: Heard of Max

    No.2
    I left disappointed with a gift, which was not what I wanted.

    No.3
    Break free means to escape or to get out of, run off means just that, to run, whereas get away with means to accomplish something without detection.

    No.4
    Potest something and persist in doing something. <phrasal verb>

    No.5
    Managers begging on their hands and knees.

    All the best.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: hear of and hear about, etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    In my dictionary I can find examples:
    I have never heard about him.
    Did you hear about the party?
    I never heard of such a thing!
    It seems the two phrases are interchangeable. That's why I ask the question.
    They appear to be interchangeable, yes, but...there's a difference in meaning:

    Hear about him <the story behind it>
    Hear of him <the person's identity>

    Heard about someone... <the story behind it>
    Heard of someone... <the person's identity>

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang
    No.3
    Do you think only 'get out of ' is correct? If the others can mean 'escape' but to different degree then does it mean all are correct?
    It's not about escaping at all. It's about an undetected act; e.g., Max called in sick Monday but wasn't sick at all. When the boss asked for a doctor's note, Max wrote one and the boss accepted it as genuine. Max got away with it! By the way, No3. is get away with, not get out of. In answer to your question, the two other choices, a. and c. don't fit the semantics.

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang
    No.4
    Does 'on their hands and knees' mean they kneel on the floor?
    Yes. The managers are pleading.

    All the best.

  5. #5
    jiang is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: hear of and hear about, etc.

    Dear Cas,
    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I see.
    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    They appear to be interchangeable, yes, but...there's a difference in meaning:

    Hear about him <the story behind it>
    Hear of him <the person's identity>

    Heard about someone... <the story behind it>
    Heard of someone... <the person's identity>

    It's not about escaping at all. It's about an undetected act; e.g., Max called in sick Monday but wasn't sick at all. When the boss asked for a doctor's note, Max wrote one and the boss accepted it as genuine. Max got away with it! By the way, No3. is get away with, not get out of. In answer to your question, the two other choices, a. and c. don't fit the semantics.

    Yes. The managers are pleading.

    All the best.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: hear of and hear about, etc.

    You're welcome.

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