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Thread: /s/ /z/ /iz/


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    #1

    /s/ /z/ /iz/

    Could you give me the rule of pronouncing /s/ /z/ or /iz/ at the bold:
    ex: dresses, plays, sandwhiches, witches, asks....

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #2

    Re: /s/ /z/ /iz/

    Quote Originally Posted by Belly T View Post
    Could you give me the rule of pronouncing /s/ /z/ or /iz/ at the bold:
    ex: dresses, plays, sandwhiches, witches, asks....
    dress[Iz]
    play[z]
    sandwhich[Iz]
    witch[Iz]
    ask[s]


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    #3

    Re: /s/ /z/ /iz/

    That's just some examples, could you give me the rule/principal of pronouncing them?

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: /s/ /z/ /iz/

    Quote Originally Posted by Belly T View Post
    Could you give me the rule of pronouncing /s/ /z/ or /iz/ at the bold:
    ex: dresses, plays, sandw[h]iches, witches, asks....
    Here's a first approximation:

    if a plural (noun) or verb ending (/s/) follows a fricative or an affricate, use /ız/:
    dress => /dresız/ ; witch => /wıʧız/; wedge => /weʤız, etc.

    if a plural (noun) or verb ending (/s/) follows any other voiceless consonant, use /s/:
    ask => /asks/ etc.

    if a plural (noun) or verb ending (/s/) follows a vowel sound or a voiced consonant (that isn't a fricative or an affricate), use /z/:
    play => /pleız/ ; weed => /wi:dz/ etc.

    There must be a site somewhere that spells all this out. I'll have a look.

    b


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    #5

    Re: /s/ /z/ /iz/

    - /s/ after voiceless sounds { p, f , th, t , k , h } except for [s, sh, ch] which are voiceless but they belong to another category called 'hissing sounds'

    -/iz/ after the hissing sounds [s , z, sh , ch, 3 , d3]

    -/z/ after all sounds saved the above.


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    #6

    Re: /s/ /z/ /iz/

    Thanks all
    But I still don't get what is "fricative" or "affricative"?

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    #7

    Re: /s/ /z/ /iz/

    Here's some definitions, I hope it helps:

    Fricative
    "A consonant, such as f or s in English, produced by the forcing of breath through a constricted passage. Also called spirant."


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    #8

    Re: /s/ /z/ /iz/

    And affricative?

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    #9

    Re: /s/ /z/ /iz/

    Affricative

    "A complex speech sound consisting of a stop consonant followed by a fricative; for example, the initial sounds of child and joy."

    Fricative is pretty simple.

    But I'm not too sure about the meaning of affricative.

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    #10

    Re: /s/ /z/ /iz/

    Actually I do understand come to think of it.

    Affricative

    Sandwiches
    Children
    Witches
    Joy
    Adjust

    Are all examples of affricatives sounds.

    [EDIT]: By the way, in case you're wondering.

    About voiced consonants (from Wikipedia):
    "A voiced consonant is a sound made as the vocal cords vibrate, as opposed to a voiceless consonant, where the vocal cords are relaxed. Examples are: In English, the main distinction between /b, d, g/ and /p, t, k/ is not that the former are voiced, but rather that the latter are aspirated. There are indeed several English dialects where /b, d, g/ are voiceless."

    Good question by the way. Very enlightening.
    Last edited by Noego; 12-Apr-2007 at 07:22.

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