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  1. #1
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    Good/ Well/ Fine

    I know the three are all adverb/ adj (expecially Good and Well). So when to use/not to use them?
    ex: She's done me good?
    I'm really well

  2. #2
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    Re: Good/ Well/ Fine

    Quote Originally Posted by Belly T View Post
    I know the three are all adverb/ adj (expecially Good and Well). So when to use/not to use them?
    ex: She's done me good?
    I'm really well
    From Practical English Usage-Michael Swan

    well and good
    Well and good can have similar meanings, but in this case well is an adverb, while good is an adjective. Compare:
    -The car runs well. (adverb modifying runs) (NOT The car runs good.)
    It's a well-made car. (adverb modifying made)
    It's a good car. (adjective modifying car)- He teaches very well.I like that teacher. He's good. (NOT He's well.)
    - She speaks English well. (NOT She speaks English good.)
    She speaks good English.
    Her English is good.
    Note that we cannot say She speaks well English. (Adverbs cannot usually go between the verb and the object.)

    fine
    The adverb fine (='well') is used in some informal expressions.
    [I]That suits me fine. You're doing fine.[/I]

    Does this help? - queenbu

  3. #3
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    Re: Good/ Well/ Fine

    maybe yes :)

  4. #4
    Dr. Jamshid Ibrahim is offline Senior Member
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    Re: Good/ Well/ Fine

    Quote Originally Posted by queenbu View Post
    From Practical English Usage-Michael Swan

    well and good
    Well and good can have similar meanings, but in this case well is an adverb, while good is an adjective. Compare:
    -The car runs well. (adverb modifying runs) (NOT The car runs good.)
    It's a well-made car. (adverb modifying made)
    It's a good car. (adjective modifying car)- He teaches very well.I like that teacher. He's good. (NOT He's well.)
    - She speaks English well. (NOT She speaks English good.)
    She speaks good English.
    Her English is good.
    Note that we cannot say She speaks well English. (Adverbs cannot usually go between the verb and the object.)

    fine
    The adverb fine (='well') is used in some informal expressions.
    [I]That suits me fine. You're doing fine.[/I]

    Does this help? - queenbu
    Well is very versatile. It can be an adjective, an adverb, a noun, a verb or used for exclamation
    1. Well can be an adjective after copula (linking) verbs meaning "in good health": I am very well
    2. Well can be the adverb of "good"
    Last edited by Dr. Jamshid Ibrahim; 13-Apr-2007 at 14:08.

  5. #5
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    Re: Good/ Well/ Fine

    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Jamshid Ibrahim View Post
    Well is very versatile. It can be an adjective, an adverb, a noun, a verb or used for exclamation
    1. Well can be an adjective after copula (linking) verbs meaning "in good health": I am very well
    2. Well can be the adverb of "good"
    I just limited myself to copying from Practical English Usage.

    We can say 'I feel good' and 'I feel well' in which case they are both adjectives, right?

  6. #6
    Dr. Jamshid Ibrahim is offline Senior Member
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    Re: Good/ Well/ Fine

    Quote Originally Posted by queenbu View Post
    I just limited myself to copying from Practical English Usage.

    We can say 'I feel good' and 'I feel well' in which case they are both adjectives, right?
    It depends on the meaning of feel which can be a link verb "adjective" or an action verb "adverb". It can also depend on the meaning of well as an adjective or the adverb of "good". Another issue is spoken English which tends to use adjectives for adverbs.

  7. #7
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    Re: Good/ Well/ Fine

    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Jamshid Ibrahim View Post
    It depends on the meaning of feel which can be a link verb "adjective" or an action verb "adverb". It can also depend on the meaning of well as an adjective or the adverb of "good". Another issue is spoken English which tends to use adjectives for adverbs.
    Who decides on what it depends?

  8. #8
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    Re: Good/ Well/ Fine

    Quote Originally Posted by queenbu View Post
    From Practical English Usage-Michael Swan

    well and good
    -The car runs well. (adverb modifying runs) (NOT The car runs good.)

    - She speaks English well. (NOT She speaks English good.)
    The principal at our school, she, an American, has never once - I've been keeping count - used well as an adverb in contexts such as the ones Swan provides. Now, I understand Swan's reasons for emphasizing "NOT" - the percentage of speakers who use good in place of well isn't at a number significant enough to make good an official synonym for well, yet; however, lest we NOT forget that native English speakers, especially Americans, do indeed say, The car runs good and She speaks English good.

    To me, it's not something you'd want to use in formal English, such as a test, an essay, or, say, a school or job interview, but even modern grammar books, especially those written by descriptive linguists, like Swan, should have at least noted the variation and, hopefully, not have ignored it. Otherwise, the underlying assumption resulting from such practice serves only to perpetuate the long standing belief that language reflects education, not intelligence.

    These days, especially with the number of accents married into English which produce difficult to parse language, coupled with a need to forego the right word and/or the correct grammar for the sake of getting the idea expressed - it's not as effective, I know, but it is reality - we, and that's ever person who speaks English, native speakers and non-native alike, have gotten used to dealing with the kind of linguistic white noise that has become a signature of international communication. We have learned to ignore it, to put it aside, and all for the sake of communicating our wants, needs, and ideas, because those are the things that truly matter to us in the end. Whether or not we eventually find or learn the right word or the correct grammar is not important at the time; but when the times does come for it to be important, that's when things really get twisted. You see, who's the authority going to be, a descriptive grammarian, like Swan, who by the way is very well thought of, or a principal of a school - like the one at mine?


    In short, who decides on what? It depends.

    Queenbu, I luv your posts.They always seem to generate great topics.

    All the best.

  9. #9
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    Re: Good/ Well/ Fine

    My teacher said" She's done me good", it's an adv

  10. #10
    Dr. Jamshid Ibrahim is offline Senior Member
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    Re: Good/ Well/ Fine

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    In short, who decides on what? It depends.

    This is what I said. To answer the question: who decides... I would like to repeat what I often mentioned: language is democratic. It is the dictatorship of the majority (usage) and not of some grammarians. Their job is only to record as objectively as possible. Of course English as a global language is exposed to all sorts of usages by different people from differnt parts of the world. This means changes in usage are on the agenda more than in any other language.
    Last edited by Dr. Jamshid Ibrahim; 13-Apr-2007 at 18:57.

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