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Thread: cut for

  1. #1
    HaraKiriBlade's Avatar
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    Default cut for

    I was wondering if "Where are you going? where have you been?" by Joyce Carol Oates cuts for naturalism.
    Can I use "cuts for" in place of "could be considered as"? I'm not sure if "cuts for" is even a usage in English but I heard something similar... as in making a cut for a placement test... or something.

    Your answers are much appreciated, as always.

    - HKB

  2. #2
    Barb_D's Avatar
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    Default Re: cut for

    You can say "counts as" informally. Could that be what you heard?
    Hey, does the lettuce and tomato on my hamburuger count as a salad?

    Making the cut means that there is a cut-off score, and you are above the required score. Say you took a test, and you have to score an 85 out of 100 to be allowed to take the next level class. If you scored an 86, you made the cut.

    However, your usage won't work.

  3. #3
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: cut for

    Quote Originally Posted by HaraKiriBlade View Post
    Can I use "cuts for" in place of "could be considered as"? I'm not sure if "cuts for" is even a usage in English but I heard something similar... as in making a cut for a placement test... or something.

    Your answers are much appreciated, as always.

    - HKB
    There is an informal idiom "to cut it", meaning "to meet the standard/make the grade/be sufficient". 'His performance wasn't bad, but he didn't really cut it for me alongside the other performers'.. Your quote could have a typo in it (omitting the it):
    I was wondering if "Where are you going? where have you been?" by Joyce Carol Oates cuts it for naturalism.
    - meaning 'I was wondering if "Where are you going? where have you been?" by Joyce Carol Oates" is an adequate example of naturalism'.

    b

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