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    • Join Date: Feb 2007
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    #1

    Equivalent of the Russian "old fat"

    Dear teachers,
    I am now searching for an English equivalent of the Russian phrase that literally sounds "live on old fat" meaning that somebody stopped developing and instead uses the knowledge, experience or reputation that were gained in the past. It is ussually used as a reproach. You can say it, for example, of a company that had some great accomplishments in the past, but no more, and clients stay with or come to this company today only because it was successful in the past. Can anybody help me with it?
    Thanx a lot


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #2

    Re: Equivalent of the Russian "old fat"

    You "live off your fat"


    • Join Date: Jun 2006
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    #3

    Re: Equivalent of the Russian "old fat"

    The expression "rest on one's laurels" has the meaning you're looking for.


    • Join Date: Dec 2006
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    #4

    Re: Equivalent of the Russian "old fat"

    Quote Originally Posted by Philly View Post
    The expression "rest on one's laurels" has the meaning you're looking for.
    Quite right, as in "He retired at the peak of his career and is resting on his laurels".

    ~word~


    • Join Date: Mar 2007
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    #5

    Re: Equivalent of the Russian "old fat"

    'he is resting on his laurels' is ok, it comes from the old Greek Olympics where a laurel wreath was awarded to the winner. He might then do nothing else in life except lie back and continue to take praise for his former achievements.

    'he is living off former glories' is another similar way of saying the same thing.


    • Join Date: Feb 2007
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    #6

    Re: Equivalent of the Russian "old fat"

    Thanks for all your ideas!
    In Russian we also say "rest on laurels" but it has no negative or reproaching meaning. No sense of the urge to change the situation. To the contrary, it sounds fairly sympathetic, while "live off old fat" implies disaproval. Any comments? By the way, if I say "live off old fat", will people understand what I mean?


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #7

    Re: Equivalent of the Russian "old fat"

    Leave out "old" and you will be fine.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #8

    Re: Equivalent of the Russian "old fat"

    Leave out "old", use "his/hers/their/our " instead and you will be fine.


    • Join Date: Feb 2007
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    #9

    Re: Equivalent of the Russian "old fat"

    Thank you all so much!!!!


    • Join Date: Dec 2006
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    #10

    Re: Equivalent of the Russian "old fat"

    Quote Originally Posted by pedant View Post
    'he is resting on his laurels' is ok, it comes from the old Greek Olympics where a laurel wreath was awarded to the winner. He might then do nothing else in life except lie back and continue to take praise for his former achievements.

    'he is living off former glories' is another similar way of saying the same thing.
    Thanx Pendant for the history. I truly enjoy learning where and how words and phrases originates.

    I am currently on a quest to discover the origination of :
    1. "Great day in the morning" which I believe has some type of religious connation regarding the rapture of Saints of God.
    2. "Copper" or " COP" is a favorite that has revealed different meanings and origination. First of all I am referring to "Copper" which is an old slang for American Policeman (Circa 1920). I have been told by my elders that "Copper" was referring to the copper badge that the policeman wore. Supposively, it was later shorten to just "Cop". However, I was later informed that as a runaway child from Mother England, we would naturally bring our native language with us. The England of olde policemen were known as "Constables On Patrol", thus; "C.O.P."
    I cannot verify the validity of either explanation; they are intriguing, nonetheless.

    I welcome any input from my brothers & sisters from across the pond (another favorite which should be self explanatory).

    ~word~

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