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  1. #11
    Philly is offline Senior Member
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    Re: Equivalent of the Russian "old fat"

    Hi word

    Sorry, I don't have any info for you, but I've just got to ask whether "supposively" was a typo or is in common usage where you're from.
    (I like knowing about "interesting" words, too. )

  2. #12
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    Re: Equivalent of the Russian "old fat"

    Quote Originally Posted by freshair View Post
    Thanks for all your ideas!
    In Russian we also say "rest on laurels" but it has no negative or reproaching meaning. No sense of the urge to change the situation. To the contrary, it sounds fairly sympathetic, while "live off old fat" implies disaproval. Any comments? By the way, if I say "live off old fat", will people understand what I mean?
    I understand what you are trying to convey. You probably want to incorporate the word "stagnant" into you statement.

    Something like "You have become stagnant with your work."

    Stagnant meaning: characterized by lack of development, advancement, or progressive movement.

    Initially, I would not have understood what you meant by "Live off old fat". I would have needed some help with the surrounding words.

    However, now that I am thinking about it, I do remember my elders saying "Quit living off of your OWN fat and get a job". I believe they were implying that eventually you are going to run out of resources and find yourself wanting. Hope this help

    ~word~

  3. #13
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    Re: Equivalent of the Russian "old fat"

    Quote Originally Posted by Philly View Post
    Hi word

    Sorry, I don't have any info for you, but I've just got to ask whether "supposively" was a typo or is in common usage where you're from.
    (I like knowing about "interesting" words, too. )

    No, it was not a typo. It is what we call "BAD GRAMMAR" because "Supposively" is not a proper word.

    However, I am constantly correcting my grammar and probably will for some time to come.

    In January of this year a co-worker had to correct me for using the word "re-enabled" which doesn't exsist as oppose to "enabled".

    Of course, you knew this and it was extremely kind of you to word it in such a way that would not offend me; for that I thank you.

    I am not easily offended because I know we will always be in a state of learning.

    Now then, I need a word to replace "Supposively" any ideas?


    Thanx again

    ~word~

  4. #14
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    Re: Equivalent of the Russian "old fat"

    Quote Originally Posted by word View Post
    Supposively, it was later shorten......
    I probably should have written "Subsequently, it was shorten to "COP".

    Thanx Philly for the "heads up".

    ~word~

  5. #15
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: Equivalent of the Russian "old fat"

    Quote Originally Posted by word View Post
    1. "Copper" or " COP" is a favorite that has revealed different meanings and origination. First of all I am referring to "Copper" which is an old slang for American Policeman (Circa 1920). I have been told by my elders that "Copper" was referring to the copper badge that the policeman wore. Supposively, it was later shorten to just "Cop". However, I was later informed that as a runaway child from Mother England, we would naturally bring our native language with us. The England of olde policemen were known as "Constables On Patrol", thus; "C.O.P."
    I cannot verify the validity of either explanation; they are intriguing, nonetheless.

    I welcome any input from my brothers & sisters from across the pond (another favorite which should be self explanatory).

    ~word~
    I have heard 'Constable of Patrol', but I have also read that the origin is from the verb 'cop' which meant to arrest or grab, which you can see in phrases like 'cop a feel', so they were coppers because they copped people. The term was used in the nineteenth century this side of the pond.

  6. #16
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    Re: Equivalent of the Russian "old fat"

    Thank you again for all your help!

  7. #17
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    Re: Equivalent of the Russian "old fat"

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    I have heard 'Constable of Patrol', but I have also read that the origin is from the verb 'cop' which meant to arrest or grab, which you can see in phrases like 'cop a feel', so they were coppers because they copped people. The term was used in the nineteenth century this side of the pond.

    WOW, WOW, WOW!

    Man, excuse my slang but "That just blows me away". That's a keeper and I'm sure Philly will enjoy reading about it.

    Thanx again

  8. #18
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Re: Equivalent of the Russian "old fat"

    Quote Originally Posted by word View Post
    ...
    Now then, I need a word to replace "Supposively" any ideas?


    ...
    "Supposedly". It has 4 syllables, whereas the simple past of "suppose" has only 2.

    Incidentally, Lord Stockton (who as plain Harold Macmillan famously used the phrase 'Wind of Change' discussed in another thread), at the time of the "privatizations" of the '80s), likened the selling off of national industries to "selling the family silver" - which is rather like 'living off one's fat', but with the added implication that it's a bad, improvident, and short-sighted thing to do.

    b

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