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  1. mehmetmamger's Avatar

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    #1

    "do a party" vs "throw a party"

    We are planning to ---- a big party for Adamís 18th birthday in the backyard for a change.

    A) do B) lend C) occur D) claim E) throw

    Do we have two answers here? It is clear that E is the desired answer, but I have some doubts whether "do" is also common and "accurate" in this context. Thanks in advance for your explanations.

    PS:
    Especially native view is needed. However, non-native answers are also welcomed.


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    #2

    Re: "do a party" vs "throw a party"

    I would never use "do a party"; "throw a party" is the collocation

  2. mehmetmamger's Avatar

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    #3

    Re: "do a party" vs "throw a party"

    Quote Originally Posted by fiona bramble View Post
    I would never use "do a party"; "throw a party" is the collocation
    But some use, and I want to understand how someone like me can understand which choice is right. Google gives great numbers for "did a great party"


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    #4

    Re: "do a party" vs "throw a party"

    Quote Originally Posted by mehmetmamger View Post
    But some use, and I want to understand how someone like me can understand which choice is right. Google gives great numbers for "did a great party"
    Wow! Well, all I can say about Google is that it contains utterances/writings of people from all language backgrounds. If I heard someone say "do a party", I would assume English was not their first language.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "do a party" vs "throw a party"

    Quote Originally Posted by fiona bramble View Post
    I would never use "do a party"; "throw a party" is the collocation
    That's the usual collocation, but you can also 'have a party', 'hold a party', 'give a party', 'lay on a party' [stronger collocations: 'lay on a feast', 'lay on a banquet'], 'arrange a party'; "do" strikes me as very odd.

    b

  4. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #6

    Re: "do a party" vs "throw a party"

    Quote Originally Posted by mehmetmamger View Post
    But some use, and I want to understand how someone like me can understand which choice is right. Google gives great numbers for "did a great party"
    "If You're Going to Do a Party, Do It Right!" | TIME There are almost 25,000 more where that one came from. I hate to be the odd one out, but I have heard that phrase - actually, I've used it. Maybe I watch too much USA TV, especially California-grown coms. That's Hollywood for ya. It's Hollywoodese. Come to think of it, I may have heard it used on British TV. Absolutely Fabulous comes to mind.

    All the best.

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: "do a party" vs "throw a party"

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    "If You're Going to Do a Party, Do It Right!" | TIME There are almost 25,000 more where that one came from. I hate to be the odd one out, but I have heard that phrase - actually, I've used it. Maybe I watch too much USA TV, especially California-grown coms. That's Hollywood for ya. It's Hollywoodese. Come to think of it, I may have heard it used on British TV. Absolutely Fabulous comes to mind.

    All the best.
    Ah yes. I'm sure you're right about Absolutely Fabulous - 'Let's do lunch' is presumably related.

    b


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    #8

    Re: "do a party" vs "throw a party"

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    "If You're Going to Do a Party, Do It Right!" | TIME There are almost 25,000 more where that one came from. I hate to be the odd one out, but I have heard that phrase - actually, I've used it. Maybe I watch too much USA TV, especially California-grown coms. That's Hollywood for ya. It's Hollywoodese. Come to think of it, I may have heard it used on British TV. Absolutely Fabulous comes to mind.

    All the best.

    Hi C,
    I hear what you're saying sister Sorry, that's a bit of a joke but yes, I get your point. My students struggle with this & similiar collocations all the time and my advice usually follows the "generally accepted & understood" route. For a non-native speaker (depending on level of acquisition) who likely makes other errors in speech, adding a trendy phrase (I think "do" is working its way around in the same way as "get" did but its collocations are not actually firmed up yet!) to his/her utterances can sometimes confuse not only the speaker, but the listener. I think we agree that "throw a party" is the generally accepted collocation.
    I do not mean to sound prescriptivist here at all but I often hold back on emerging slang unless the learner's level warrants it! Just my approach though
    Just do it!
    Fiona

  6. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #9

    Re: "do a party" vs "throw a party"

    Quote Originally Posted by fiona bramble View Post
    I think we agree that "throw a party" is the generally accepted collocation.

    I do not mean to sound prescriptivist here...
    The test question sure does seem that way though, doesn't it?
    We are planning to _______ a big party for Adamís 18th birthday in the backyard for a change.

    A) do B) lend C) occur D) claim E) throw
    I agree with you. Choice E) is the more expected collocation. DO works, too; it's substantive and the verb it substitutes for is provided in E), which is why E) is the better or correct choice, not A).

    All the best.

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