Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1
    Noego is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • French
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    583
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default China: How to avoid "Do you understand?"

    I'm having a hard time not using "do you understand?" Although some students will admit they do, most of them won't.

    It's hard for me to determine whether or not they understood what I said.

    According to the article I've mentioned before:

    "Nor should you expect students to ask questions in class if they don’t understand something. A former student of mine told me: “In China, a student who asks questions is considered a pain in the neck.” Check understanding by asking students to paraphrase or write questions they have in groups."

    I understand this is this person's opinion but do you think it's true?

    It's true that my Chinese students seldom ask any questions at all.

    The thing is, I'm always available for them if they have questions, even in my free time. I would really wish they would ask me more things but they don't.

    Sometimes I teach something and they say they understand but when I ask them later I find that they didn't. How can I avoid this? How can I evaluate their understanding of what I'm saying? Is there any effective way to do this?

    Would it be better to form team and write questions in groups? Has anyone tried this?

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    43,285
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: China: How to avoid "Do you understand?"

    Instead of asking whether they have uderstood ask something that will; demonstrate their understanding. In some cultures admitting that you don't understand can be seen as a sign of failure, rather than asking for a better or different explanation.

  3. #3
    Noego is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • French
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    583
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: China: How to avoid "Do you understand?"

    Ok, I'll try it. I'll try to ask them to explain to me what I said in their own words.

    Thanks.

Similar Threads

  1. Travel / Traveling Overseas
    By eric2004 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 63
    Last Post: 06-Jan-2004, 21:17

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •