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  1. #1
    jiang is offline Key Member
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    Default bring up to sb. etc.

    Dear teachers,

    I have three questions to ask:

    No.1
    This is a sentence in my text:
    Probably we shall be astonished at the number of propositions met with in everyday life which we shall find it necessary to class as groundless.
    I get confused by the word 'it'. 'which' in sentence refers to the previous part of the sentence. Could what does 'it' refer to? Or is it a typo?

    No.2
    Many of our beliefs are held simply as a result of teh fact that we happen to have been "brought up" to them.
    I know the phrase "bring up", which means "to look after a child and educate them until they are old enough to look after themselves ". Could you please explain the meaning of "bring up to sb"? I can't find it in my dictionary.

    No.3
    So the fact that a belief is "old " is no argument in its favour.
    Could you please explain if the sentence means "You can't argue successfully by saying that a belief is 'old'"?



    Could you please explain them to me?


    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Last edited by jiang; 24-Apr-2007 at 11:13.

  2. #2
    curmudgeon's Avatar
    curmudgeon is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: bring up to sb. etc.

    Hi Jiang,

    No.1 is, in my opinion very badly written...

    Probably we shall be astonished at the number of propositions met with in everyday life which we shall find it necessary to class as groundless.

    We will probably be amazed at the number of propositions we meet with in everyday life where we will find it necessary to class them as groundless.

    Better, but still a bit of a mouthful.

    No. 2

    Many of our beliefs are held simply as a result of the fact that we happen to have been "brought up" with them.

    Brought up means raised as a child. You bring up children, but children are brought up.

    You could be brought up to believe in certain things

    To bring up to somebody, means to raise an issue with them, such as 'I will bring that up with him when I see him'

    No 3

    You interpretation is correct. Just because something has been around and accepted for a long time doesn't mean it is correct.
    Last edited by curmudgeon; 24-Apr-2007 at 05:42.

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