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Thread: buzz

  1. angliholic's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile buzz

    The bustle/buzz of city life really bewildered me when I first came to Taipei.


    I think bustle works here, but I am not certain of buzz. Are there other terms that can take the place of bustle here? Thanks.

  2. Fieldmouse's Avatar

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    #2

    Re: buzz

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    The bustle/buzz of city life really bewildered me when I first came to Taipei.


    I think bustle works here, but I am not certain of buzz. Are there other terms that can take the place of bustle here? Thanks.
    Hi Angliholic,

    A popular English idiom is "the hustle and bustle of city life".

    Regards,
    Fieldmouse

  3. angliholic's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: buzz

    Thanks, Fieldmouse.
    It's so familiar--the hustle and bustle of city life.


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    #4

    Re: buzz

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    The bustle/buzz of city life really bewildered me when I first came to Taipei.


    I think bustle works here, but I am not certain of buzz. Are there other terms that can take the place of bustle here? Thanks.
    Buzz works fine, as it draws a comparison with a bee hive. Buzz is sometimes used to indicate excitement too - "I get a buzz out of playing tennis."

    Other terms really depend on what aspect you want to emphasise. Your sentence seems to imply that city life was a bit overwhelming, presumably because you came from a smaller, quieter place. If that is the case, you could use pace, rush, urgency, chaos, hurly-burly, commotion, tumult - there are many words!

  4. angliholic's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: buzz

    Thanks, Andrew, for the wonderful alternatives.

    Btw, where have you been? I haven't seen you here for ages.


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    #6

    Re: buzz

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    Thanks, Andrew, for the wonderful alternatives.

    Btw, where have you been? I haven't seen you here for ages.
    You are welcome!

    I am still around, though not as active - work has been a bit busy lately! This is a good thing of course - no work would be a tragedy - but it does eat into my spare time...

    Thank you for asking, it is nice to be remembered

  5. angliholic's Avatar
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    #7

    Smile Re: buzz

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Whitehead View Post
    You are welcome!

    I am still around, though not as active - work has been a bit busy lately! This is a good thing of course - no work would be a tragedy - but it does eat into my spare time...

    Thank you for asking, it is nice to be remembered
    Thank you again, Andrew.
    It's great to hear from you again--you're like an old friend to me due to those help you offered in the past.
    Btw, why did you write "work does eat into my spare time..." Into sounds particularly uncommon to me; it seems dispensable to me. Yet, I presume if I omit it, I'll make a change to the sentence. I stand corrected.


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    #8

    Re: buzz

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    Thank you again, Andrew.
    It's great to hear from you again--you're like an old friend to me due to those help you offered in the past.
    Btw, why did you write "work does eat into my spare time..." Into sounds particularly uncommon to me; it seems dispensable to me. Yet, I presume if I omit it, I'll make a change to the sentence. I stand corrected.
    *twinkle at Angliholic*

    'work does eat my spare time' would be okay, but leaves it unclear how much of your spare time is eaten.

    'work does eat into my spare time' makes it clear that only some of my spare time is being eaten.

    If you eat a pie, it is all on gone. If you eat into a pie there is still some left. The phrase is more common when talking about resources such as time or money than about food though!

  6. angliholic's Avatar
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    #9

    Smile Re: buzz

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Whitehead View Post
    *twinkle at Angliholic*

    'work does eat my spare time' would be okay, but leaves it unclear how much of your spare time is eaten.

    'work does eat into my spare time' makes it clear that only some of my spare time is being eaten.

    If you eat a pie, it is all on gone. If you eat into a pie there is still some left. The phrase is more common when talking about resources such as time or money than about food though!
    Thanks, Andrew.
    "Eat into my spare time" makes perfect sense to me now thanks to your parse. Thanks, for your teaching.
    Surfing the internet does eat into my spare time too.
    Now, there is one more thing I have to learn from you--What is "twinkle at angliholic?"


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    #10

    Re: buzz

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    Thanks, Andrew.
    "Eat into my spare time" makes perfect sense to me now thanks to your parse. Thanks, for your teaching.
    Surfing the internet does eat into my spare time too.
    Now, there is one more thing I have to learn from you--What is "twinkle at angliholic?"
    'twinkle' is normally used for stars or small lights, but it can be used to describe people when they smile, look friendly, or look cute to attract your attention. An older phrase is 'making eyes' at somebody.

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