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Thread: granner topic

  1. #1
    Anonymous Guest

    Default granner topic

    respected mam/sir,
    i could not follow these two structure which widely used in english

    TO+ing and had +to be+pastparticipent
    so would u guide me please

  2. #2
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
    MikeNewYork is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: granner topic

    Quote Originally Posted by guest
    respected mam/sir,
    i could not follow these two structure which widely used in english

    TO+ing and had +to be+pastparticipent
    so would u guide me please
    In English, the more common structure of an infinitive is [to] + [base verb form]. There are infinitives that appear with out the [to] in some cases.

    When one encounters [to] + ["ing" verb form] it is much different from an infinitive. The "ing" form is a present participle of a verb or a gerund.
    In most cases, when one encounters [to] + ["ing verb], the [to] is a preposition or it is part of a phrasal verb that ends in [to], called either a preposition or a particle.

    I look forward to seeing you.
    [I] [look forward to] [seeing] [you].
    subject - phrasal verb - gerund acting as verb direct object - object of gerund.

    John was reading a guide to running marathons.
    [John] [was reading] [a guide] [to] [running] marathons]
    subject - verb - verb direct object - preposition - gerund acting as the object of the preposition - object of the gerund.

    [to] + [be] + [past participle]

    This is the structure of a passive infinitive. In English, the passive voice changes a sentence such that the subject is the recipient of the action, not the doer of the action.

    John painted the fence. [John is the subject and he did the action.]
    The fence was painted by John. [John still did the action, but "fence" is the subject.]

    The infinitive form of the second verb would be "to be painted".

    This infinitive can be used in a sentence where an infinitive could be used.

    John was waiting for his car to be painted.

    You will find more information here:

    http://webster.commnet.edu/grammar/verbs.htm

  3. #3
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default

    Object to+ ing
    Be Dedicated to + ing

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