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  1. #1
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    Default too deep for any noise

    From Joseph Conrad's The Warrior's Soul.

    What is the meaning of the word deep below?

    You know what an impermanent thing such slumber is. One moment you drop into an abyss and the next you are back in the world that you would think too deep for any noise but the trumpet of the Last Judgment. And then off you go again. Your very soul seems to slip down into a bottomless black pit. Then up once more into a startled consciousness. A mere plaything of cruel sleep one is, then. Tormented both ways.


    In what way can a world be too deep for any noise but ... or don't I read the sentence properly?

  2. #2
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: too deep for any noise

    He is describing that kind of sleep where you are on edge, so you fall asleep but then surface briefly before dropping back into sleep. A restive sleep.

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    Default Re: too deep for any noise

    Hi Anglika

    I have no problem understanding the paragraph as a whole. If you could possibly elobarate on the word deep? What kind of deep are we talking about? I just can't make sense of it.

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    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: too deep for any noise

    An analogy would be a hole so deep that no speck of light or hint of sound can be perceived from the bottom.

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    Default Re: too deep for any noise

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    An analogy would be a hole so deep that no speck of light or hint of sound can be perceived from the bottom.
    Hm, I'm still not getting it. Is it the abyss that is deep? I thought it was "the world" - I mean, first "you" drop into an abyss, then you are back in the world that you would think too deep for any noise but the trumpet of the Last Judgment.

  6. #6
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: too deep for any noise

    Are you sure you've transcribed it right? As you say, it seems to be saying that the world is deep - and that doesn't make sense. It would if there were a few extra words:


    One moment you drop into an abyss and the next you are back in the world, out of a sleep that you would think too deep for any noise but the trumpet of the Last Judgment to wake you from.

    [It's a bit clumsy like that, but I was trying to disturb Conrad's word order as little as possible.]

    b

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    Default Re: too deep for any noise

    Hi BobK

    Well, the text comes from Project Gutenberg and I've copied the excerpt directly from it. Thank God I wasn't the only one thinking there was something strange here. I was beginning to think that I don't know any English at all. Could it at all be possible that a sentence structure like this is some kind of remnant of Conrad's polish past?

    Anyway, I really like your little addition. It makes more sense. I have to give it some thought, though, before I translate something which, at least on the surface, isn't there.


    And, of course, thank you BobK.

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    Default Re: too deep for any noise

    Quote Originally Posted by Caorthine View Post
    Hi BobK

    Well, the text comes from Project Gutenberg and I've copied the excerpt directly from it. Thank God I wasn't the only one thinking there was something strange here. I was beginning to think that I don't know any English at all. Could it at all be possible that a sentence structure like this is some kind of remnant of Conrad's polish past?

    Anyway, I really like your little addition. It makes more sense. I have to give it some thought, though, before I translate something which, at least on the surface, isn't there.


    And, of course, thank you BobK.
    Well, I know only two or three words of Polish, though I suppose L1 interference is possible.

    And you're welcome.

    b

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