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Thread: wish

  1. #11
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    Are these correct? If so, what do they mean? If not, why are they incorrect?

    1. I wish you were here.
    2. I wish you are here.

  2. #12
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    "I wish you were here" is correct. It means that you regret that the person you're talking to (phone, letter...) is not here, and that you would prefer she was.
    2) is incorrect.

    FRC

  3. #13
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    Can you explain to me what does this mean so I can understand why is it wrong?

    1. I wish you are here.

    Also, are these correct? What do these mean?
    2. I wish I have killed him.
    3. I wish I had killed him.
    4. I wish I have showered.
    5. I wish I had showered.

    6. I wished I have killed him.
    7. I wished I had killed him.
    8. I wished I have showered.
    9. I wished I had showered.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    Can you explain to me what does this mean so I can understand why is it wrong?

    1. I wish you are here.
    'I wish' goes with 'were', like this,

    I wish I were
    I wish you were
    I wish she were
    I wish he were
    I wish they were
    I wish we were

    That 'wish' does not go with 'are' has to do with (a) the meaning of 'wish' and (b) the history of the English language. 'I wish...were' is a fossil, a remnant of the subjunctive mood. Native speakers either know the paradigm above because their language providers (e.g., parents, teachers) use it or they don't know it and use 'was' instead,

    I wish I was
    I wish you were
    I wish she was
    I wish he was
    I wish they were
    I wish we were

    'wish' expresses a desire, an aspiration or a demand. Historically, the subjunctive was used to refer to someone else's desires, aspirations or demands. It had the paradigm:

    I were
    You were
    She were
    He were
    They were
    We were

    And that paradigm survived into Modern English. If, however, we don't hear people using 'I were', then we use what comes natural to us: 'I was'. :wink:

    The forms, I am, you are, and so, belong to a completely different paradigm:

    Present: I am , you are
    Subjunctive: I were, you were

    ===
    2. I wish I have killed him. :(
    3. I wish I had killed him. :D

    I wish now at the rresent time that I had in the past killed him.

    4. I wish I have showered. :(
    5. I wish I had showered. :D

    6. I wished I have killed him. :(
    7. I wished I had killed him. :D

    I wished at that time in the past that I had killed him in the past.

    8. I wished I have showered. :(
    9. I wished I had showered. :D

  5. #15
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    *Wish does not go with present verbs.

    1. I wish this is over. (So this is incorrect?)

  6. #16
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    I wish this is over. (So this is incorrect?)
    I think so.

    FRC

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    *Wish does not go with present verbs.

    1. I wish this is over. (So this is incorrect?)
    I wish this was over. :D
    I wish this were over. :D

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