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  1. #1
    simile is offline Junior Member
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    Lightbulb Questions on ambiguity

    Questions on ambiguity:
    Ex: It has been three years since my aunt stayed here.
    -->What does the sentence mean?
    Meaning one: My aunt has stayed here for three years.
    Meaning two: My aunt left here three years ago.
    Which one is correct? Or both are acceptable?

    Ex: It has been 10 years since I lived here.
    -->What does the sentence mean?
    Meaning one: I have lived here for 10 years.
    Meaning two: I left here 10 years ago.
    Which one is correct? Or both are acceptable?

  2. #2
    mykwyner is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Questions on ambiguity

    Both sentences have meaning number two.

    If you want to say that your aunt has been living here for the past three years and still lives here today say, "My aunt has been living here for three years."

    Example two would follow the same form if you want meaning number one, "I have been living here for ten years."

  3. #3
    simile is offline Junior Member
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    Question Re: Questions on ambiguity

    Quote Originally Posted by mykwyner View Post
    Both sentences have meaning number two.

    If you want to say that your aunt has been living here for the past three years and still lives here today say, "My aunt has been living here for three years."

    Example two would follow the same form if you want meaning number one, "I have been living here for ten years."
    And what about this one:
    It has been five years since he studied abroad.
    (= He has studied abroad for five years. <--???)
    Meaning one: He still studies abroad for now.
    Meaning two: He studied abroad five years ago, and stopped this action five years ago.

    Is it all about the sentence pattern "S + have + p.p.~ since S + V-ed"?
    Or the verb we use?

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Questions on ambiguity

    Meaning two: He studied abroad five years ago, and stopped this action five years ago.

    Ex: It has been five years since he studied abroad.

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