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  1. #1
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    Default articulation problem

    hi!
    i've got a problem.
    according to wiki, this is the right IPA chart.
    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...chart_2005.png
    and in it, in terms of primary articulation there is this square, which is signed "advanced".
    and this is my question: what does it mean??
    i know all the rest - dental, apical, laminal, retracted, centralized but unfortunately i have no idea what "primary advanced articulation" is.
    could anyone help me, please?
    thanx in advance.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: articulation problem

    Hello, axid.

    I can't pull up the link--it works, but I am in China at the moment and we don't have access to Wikipedia or Wiki. If you are looking at vowels, then the term advanced is most likely in reference to tongue root, ATR.

    Definition
    Advanced tongue root refers to the features of a sound made by drawing the root of the tongue forward. This feature distinguishes between tense vowels as [+ ATR] and lax vowels as [- ATR] (Burquest and Payne 1993 18 ). Source: What is advanced tongue root?

    You can read more here: (I, however, can't. ) Advanced tongue root - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Does that help?
    Last edited by Casiopea; 16-May-2007 at 12:55.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: articulation problem

    yes
    thanks a lot.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: articulation problem

    You're most welcome.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: articulation problem

    But according to that Wikipedia chart, Casi, ATR is in the 'secondary articulation' column; the chart is about diacritics in general - not just for use with symbols representing vowels. The entry in question is just 'Advanced'. My guess is that the symbol marked with this diacritic represents a sound that is simply produced nearer the front of the mouth than the symbol on its own would suggest; but when I learnt about the IPA symbols I didn't pay very close attention to the bit about diacritics.

    b

  6. #6
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    Default Re: articulation problem

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    But according to that Wikipedia chart, Casi, ATR is in the 'secondary articulation' column; the chart is about diacritics in general - not just for use with symbols representing vowels.
    Cool. Could you tell me if this is the same chart, and if so where this diacritic is located?

  7. #7
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    Default Re: articulation problem

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    Cool. Could you tell me if this is the same chart, and if so where this diacritic is located?
    'Fraid it's not. The Wikipedia one has a separate box at the foot of the chart, with the heading 'DIACRITICS'. I'll have a look elsewhere, but not right now.



    b

  8. #8
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    Default Re: articulation problem

    What about this chart: International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) Chart Unicode ‚€œKeyboard‚€Ě

    The ATR (advanced tongue root) symbol is different from the Advanced symbol, which is a vertical line drawn under a vowel. Is that it?

  9. #9
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    Default Re: articulation problem

    Ah. Here we go. This is the chart: International Phonetic Alphabet: Definition and Much More from Answers.com, and here's the explanation. From the same source:

    fronted (phonetics)
    In phonetics, a fronted or advanced sound is one that is pronounced further to the front of the vocal tract than some reference point. The diacritic for this in the International Phonetic Alphabet is the subscript plus, [ ̟]. Both consonants and vowels may be marked as fronted.

    In English, the back vowel /u/ is further forward than what is normally indicated by the IPA letter <u>. This fronting may be shown explicitly, especially within a narrow transcription: [u̟ʷ]. Whether this is as far front as the central vowel [ʉ], or somewhere between [u] and [ʉ], may need to be clarified verbally.

    fronted: Information from Answers.com

  10. #10
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    Default Re: articulation problem



    b

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