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  1. #1
    retro's Avatar
    retro is offline Member
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    Default reputation, distinguished, reputed

    I was wondering if He's distinguished himself as an athlete is equivalent to
    He's gained a reputation as an athlete.

    I also would like to know if She is reputed to be a good singer differs from She has a reputation as a good singer in that the former suggests uncertanity (she is said to be a good singer) while the latter is a fact (she's a public figure).

    Lastly, what's the difference between Weak construction is reputed to be the cause of (the) collapse of the house and Weak construction is reputed to have been the cause of (the) collapse of the house?

    Anyway, are the examples fine?

    Thanx a lot.
    Last edited by retro; 14-May-2007 at 22:35.

  2. #2
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: reputation, distinguished, reputed

    He's distinguished himself as an athlete As an athlete he has acquired the respect of others
    He's gained a reputation as an athlete. He has become known as an athlete

    I also would like to know if She is reputed to be a good singer differs from She has a reputation as a good singer in that the former suggests uncertanity (she is said to be a good singer) while the latter is a fact (she's a public figure). A considerable difference as you have indicated - in the first example she has not yet got the reputation, but is "thought to be" a good singer; in the second she has acquired the reputation.

    Weak construction is reputed to be the cause of the collapse of the house Weak construction is reputed to have been the cause of the collapse of the house? No semantic difference; purely the difference between using a straight infinitive and the perfect of "to be".

    Anyway, are the examples fine? As sentences in themselves, yes.

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