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Thread: You Win!

  1. #1
    julia.rolim is offline Newbie
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    Default You Win!

    Hi...
    I want to know why is it "you win" (a game for example) and not you won.
    Can you explain this to me?
    Tks

  2. #2
    Super Sonic is offline Member
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    Default Re: You Win!

    Hi julia,

    I remember seeing the sentence "you won" in some fighting games.

  3. #3
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: You Win!

    Quote Originally Posted by julia.rolim View Post
    Hi...
    I want to know why is it "you win" (a game for example) and not you won.
    Can you explain this to me?
    Tks
    It's an idiom, only used immediately at the end of a game.

    [On the tennis-court] 'You win. Where shall we go for a drink after we've got changed?'

    'You won'/'you've won' would be the right expression to use in any later report:

    We played yesterday and you won.

    We've played many times, and you've always won.


    In this last case, using the present in the second clause would make the sentence into an implied prediction:

    We've played many times, and you always win. [So next time we play, you'll win again.]

    b

  4. #4
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    Default Re: You Win!

    Welcome, julia.rolim.

    In addition, the present tense is used to express a truth or fact; e.g., You win! That's a fact, right? Won, the past tense form, is used to talk about the past; e.g., the game is over, and you won!

    Both of these You win! and You won! are perfectly acceptable. The first one expresses a fact, the second one tells us the game is over.

    Does that help?

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