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Thread: 'Tain't so!

  1. #1
    Anonymous Guest

    Default 'Tain't so!

    Hello,

    Some questions to ask:

    1) What does the "'Tain't so" mean? Like "'Tain't so! They know it."

    2) I don't understand the meaning of the following sentence:

    "Sadly, it was that very feeling, that unspoken, unlooked-at gnawing that gave birth to the "me here, God out there" syndrome."

    What is it talking about? a syndrome? is it possible to "give birth to the syndrome"??? very confused, pls help.

    Tks,

    :(

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    'Tain't so' means 'it isn't so'. It is used to correct or contradict someone. (It ain't so)

    Here 'give birth' means cause or start. The syndrome, presumably, relates to a break in the relationship between the individual and God, but without more context I can't be sure. Could you quote a bit more.?

  3. #3
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    Default Re: 'Tain't so!

    Quote Originally Posted by superbee
    Hello,

    Some questions to ask:

    1) What does the "'Tain't so" mean? Like "'Tain't so! They know it."

    2) I don't understand the meaning of the following sentence:

    "Sadly, it was that very feeling, that unspoken, unlooked-at gnawing that gave birth to the "me here, God out there" syndrome."

    What is it talking about? a syndrome? is it possible to "give birth to the syndrome"??? very confused, pls help.

    Tks,

    :(
    "It ain't so" is informal, because of the use of "ain't". "'Tain't so" is even more informal. It represents a dialectal way of speaking.

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    The positive form is 'Tis so'.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    The positive form is 'Tis so'.
    'Tis true, that. :wink:

  6. #6
    beeja is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    Here 'give birth' means cause or start. The syndrome, presumably, relates to a break in the relationship between the individual and God, but without more context I can't be sure. Could you quote a bit more.?
    The full context is as follows:

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Over the countless eons, that feeling has never felt. More times than not, we've felt downright hostile, as an abandoned kid might feel towards his parents. Yet, deep within, we've maintained an elusive remembrance that we were perhaps a part of something much grander than our own selves.

    Sadly, it was that very feeling, that unspoken, unlooked-at gnawing that gave birth to the "me here, God out there" syndrome. We no longer held the total knowings of the whole, so what were we? We knew we were separate packages of something, but of what? And in that separation, we started hurting, and feeling isolated, and very, very alone.

    But now that deep feeling of aloneness, and our frustration of not knowing who we truely are, is pushing us to wake up and remember, a push that is coming directly from our soul, the divine record-keeper of our being. Our soul has acquired all the feelings and experiences of separation that it can handle, and is doing everything possible to force us into remembrance of where we came from and who we are, so that it can get on with what it was created to do in the first place.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The red sentence is so confused. Pls explain.

    Tks,

  7. #7
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    I think it means that the religious impulse lurks in the background in this secular age, but as we have become secular, we feel isolated from the idea of being a part in a huge scheme of things. It seems to imply that we have broken the relationship with God, who is now outside, rather than inside our being.

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