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    #1

    fellows of their colleges...

    What does this sentence mean? Could you tell me, please? I need to know it as soon as possible...

    The teachers in Oxford are commonly called "dons". Most of these are Fellows of their colleges, but at the same time many hold university appointments, as lecturers or professors.

    (The bolded expression confuses me... What does it mean? Does it mean "members"? If it does, then it's clear that the teachers (dons) work as lecturers or professors, isn't it?)

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: fellows of their colleges...

    A Fellow is usually involved in teaching, but may simply do research; and in some cases a Fellow is a mature student. A college may also invite an overseas academic to come and just be 'in residence'; one could say that sort of Visiting Fellow was involved in teaching, but he may simply hold a few seminars.

    So a Fellow is not just a Member. I, for example, am a Member of my college, but not a Fellow.

    b


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    #3

    Re: fellows of their colleges...

    Hmmm.... I don't understand it much. But that doesn't matter.

    A Fellow is usually involved in teaching, but may simply do research
    So a Fellow is not just a Member. I, for example, am a Member of my college, but not a Fellow.
    Why are you not a Fellow? What is the difference between you and a fellow? You say that a Fellow is usually involved in teaching and may simply do research (but may means that he/she doesn't have to, am I right?)
    I mean that doing reasearch is not probably an integral criterion of (for?) being a Fellow.

    (Could you correct my English, please?)

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: fellows of their colleges...

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    Hmmm.... I don't understand it much. But that doesn't matter.
    Sorry Lenka. It's not easy, and I don't fully understand it myself! Dealing with a 650+-year-old institution, there are lots of traditions and unspoken agreements and archaic roles/language involved. For example, at my college there is an official called a 'Praelector'. I'm not sure what he does, apart from organizing ceremonies and speaking Latin with an extraordinary accent. Sometimes, you can't hope to understand; you just dismiss it - 'that's the way they do it'.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    ...

    Why are you not a Fellow? I haven't applied. I don't do any work for the college. What is the difference between you and a fellow? A Fellow lives in or near the college, works full- or part-time for the college, and sits on the Governing Body (the body that governs what goes on within the college). I don't; I even live many miles from Cambridge. You say that a Fellow is usually involved in teaching and may simply do research (but may means that he/she doesn't have to, am I right?)
    I mean that doing research is not probably an integral criterion of (for?) being a Fellow. ('criterion for' sounds better to me, but I've heard it with of.)

    (Could you correct my English, please? There's very little need! )
    b


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    #5

    Re: fellows of their colleges...

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Sorry Lenka. It's not easy, and I don't fully understand it myself! Dealing with a 650+-year-old institution, there are lots of traditions and unspoken agreements and archaic roles/language involved. For example, at my college there is an official called a 'Praelector'. I'm not sure what he does, apart from organizing ceremonies and speaking Latin with an extraordinary accent. Sometimes, you can't hope to understand; you just dismiss it - 'that's the way they do it'.



    b
    Thank you very much, Bob... I am so happy at the moment... I've passed my school leaving exams today... and with very good results .
    Actually, the expression "Fellows of ..." was in one of the texts I was supposed to read for the exams... But I didn't need it, at last... I got another question (not the topic "education").

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: fellows of their colleges...

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    Thank you very much, Bob... I am so happy at the moment... I've passed my school leaving exams today... and with very good results .
    ...
    Congratulations - I hope that doesn't mean we're going to see less of you!

    b


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    #7

    Re: fellows of their colleges...

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Congratulations - I hope that doesn't mean we're going to see less of you!

    b
    Thanks .

    I don't think so - I will need English probably even more than I have ever needed it; in addition, maybe I will study English at university next year... I'll see... (By the way, where should I have put the word "maybe" in the previous sentence? Is it right?)

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    #8

    Re: fellows of their colleges...

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    ...
    I don't think so - I will need English probably even more than I have ever needed it; in addition, maybe I will study English at university next year... I'll see... (By the way, where should I have put the word "maybe" in the previous sentence? Is it right?)
    The "maybe" is OK where it is, but it would read better if 'in addition' were the only adverbial - 'in addition, I may study English at university next year.'

    b


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    #9

    Re: fellows of their colleges...

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    The "maybe" is OK where it is, but it would read better if 'in addition' were the only adverbial - 'in addition, I may study English at university next year.'

    b
    Thank you very much, you're very kind!

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