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  1. #1
    san is offline Member
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    Question Present Perfect Tense

    I would like to know why the writer used the present perfect in this sentence:

    " I have heard that your dad is ill, that he is in the hospital with heart
    problems. Your dad is a very special person. I have always enjoyed laughing with him and spending time with him ( for the record-I have never yet tasted any hotter pepper than what he makes!)"

    first question: why the present perfect was used?
    second question: the word yet was used in the middle of a sentence. does it imply emphasis?
    and I would like wht for the record means in the sentence.

    thanks

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: Present Perfect Tense

    1 It's recent news and relevant now
    2 Yes
    3 For the record- this is a way of making a statement offical; he can be quoted on this

  3. #3
    san is offline Member
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    Re: Present Perfect Tense

    Thank you Tdol!!!! to make the statement official? Mening he wants to come and taste the pepper sauce ( pimento) ? Is theat it ?

    Oh boy!!! It is a unique language!!! hehehehehehe

  4. #4
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    Re: Present Perfect Tense

    Hi,
    I would say the second use of present perfect is not quite appropriated. I'd rather say: '... and I used to enjoy laughing and spending time with him.' The yet use, well, I'd say it's colloquial. People would speak like that , but not write it down.
    Jackie

  5. #5
    san is offline Member
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    Re: Present Perfect Tense

    If you use the structure " I used to ..." means that you donīt like to spend time with him anymore. It would sound a bit rude considering the circumstances. And I agree with Tdol when saying that it is recent and relevant news. And yes, yet in the middle of the sentence is more used in spoken English. But when it comes to writing as we lack sources as intonation and body language we need to structure the sentences in a different way to cause the desired effect.

    and I think I can consider for the record ( as the person has already tasted the pepper ) a way of saying that he or she hopes to taste it again . is that correct ?

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