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  1. #1
    PINKGREAT is offline Member
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    Default Is a word missed?

    Good evening, dear teachers!

    Is any word in the sentence is missed?

    'Mr. Humfries was often taken by the uninitiated to be Mr. Bertram in person.'

    Should something go after word 'uninitiated'?

    Thanks in advance.

    Olga

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Is a word missed?

    Olga,

    are you trying to say that the two men weremistaken for each other by those who did not know them?

  3. #3
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: Is a word missed?

    Quote Originally Posted by PINKGREAT View Post
    Good evening, dear teachers!

    Is any word in the sentence is *missed?

    'Mr. Humfries was often taken by the uninitiated to be Mr. Bertram in person.'

    Should something go after word 'uninitiated'?

    Thanks in advance.

    Olga
    In some contexts, an adjective can imply a noun (=people or things). The word 'uninitiated' is often used like this; the article is a clue.

    So nothing is missed out; 'the uninitiated' here means 'those people who are not/have not been initiated'. The use of the term 'initiated' implies some kind of secret society or ritual (the 'ritual' in this case perhaps just being the common practise of Mr Bertram's clientèle). The word suggests that Mr Bertram's shop (was it a shop?) was special in some way; people spoke to each other in hushed tones, for example - as if it were a holy place.

    b
    * 'missing' or 'missed out' would be better; though 'missed' on its own isn't wrong. The second 'is', though, is wrong

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