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  1. #1
    jiang is offline Key Member
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    Default add to and add in

    Dear teachers,

    Please read the following sentence:

    How come a simple meal like this costs so much?
    We have ______ in your bill the cost of the cup you broke.
    a. included b. added
    The key is 'a' without doubt. My question concerns with 'b'.

    I can rewrite the sentence this way 'We have added the cost of the cup you broke to your bill'. This means the cost of the meal is fixed in the first place. The cost of the cup you broke is additional amount of money. Am I right?

    If I chose 'b' that means the cost of the cup was included in the original
    bill in the first place, which doesn't make sense. Am I right?

    I am looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

  2. #2
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
    MikeNewYork is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: add to and add in

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang
    Dear teachers,

    Please read the following sentence:

    How come a simple meal like this costs so much?
    We have ______ in your bill the cost of the cup you broke.
    a. included b. added
    The key is 'a' without doubt. My question concerns with 'b'.

    I can rewrite the sentence this way 'We have added the cost of the cup you broke to your bill'. This means the cost of the meal is fixed in the first place. The cost of the cup you broke is additional amount of money. Am I right?
    Yes, you are correct. [The cost of the cup you broke is an additional amount of money.]

    If I chose 'b' that means the cost of the cup was included in the original
    bill in the first place, which doesn't make sense. Am I right?

    [/quote]

    You can't choose "b" because of the "in your bill". You could use "added" if you take those three words out, or you could use "added to". :wink:

  3. #3
    jiang is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: add to and add in

    :D & :?

    Dear Mike,
    I understood most of your explanations. What I don't quite understand is 'add in'. I read a sentence in Longman dictionary of contemporary English: add sth in: to include something with something else: By the time we added in the cost of the drinks the bill was over pounds( pound should have been the symbol but I there isn't the symbol on my keyboard). What occurred to me is that there must be a difference between 'add to' and 'add in' here. So could you please kindly explain the meaning of the sentence in the dictionary?

    I am looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by jiang
    Dear teachers,

    Please read the following sentence:

    How come a simple meal like this costs so much?
    We have ______ in your bill the cost of the cup you broke.
    a. included b. added
    The key is 'a' without doubt. My question concerns with 'b'.

    I can rewrite the sentence this way 'We have added the cost of the cup you broke to your bill'. This means the cost of the meal is fixed in the first place. The cost of the cup you broke is additional amount of money. Am I right?
    Yes, you are correct. [The cost of the cup you broke is an additional amount of money.]

    If I chose 'b' that means the cost of the cup was included in the original
    bill in the first place, which doesn't make sense. Am I right?
    You can't choose "b" because of the "in your bill". You could use "added" if you take those three words out, or you could use "added to". :wink:[/quote]

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default

    'Add in' has the idea of something extra to me; something that wouldn't normally be included.

  5. #5
    jiang is offline Key Member
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    Default

    :? :?

    How come a simple meal like this costs so much?
    We have ______ in your bill the cost of the cup you broke.
    a. included b. added


    Do you mean 'b' is correct? Could you please explain it to me? I am really confused this time.

    I am looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang



    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    'Add in' has the idea of something extra to me; something that wouldn't normally be included.

  6. #6
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
    MikeNewYork is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: add to and add in

    [quote="jiang"]:D & :?

    Dear Mike,
    I understood most of your explanations. What I don't quite understand is 'add in'. I read a sentence in Longman dictionary of contemporary English: add sth in: to include something with something else: By the time we added in the cost of the drinks the bill was over pounds( pound should have been the symbol but I there isn't the symbol on my keyboard). What occurred to me is that there must be a difference between 'add to' and 'add in' here. So could you please kindly explain the meaning of the sentence in the dictionary? [/quoted]

    Yes, you can use "added in" in that way. You are "adding in" an item or an ingredient. You are not adding in the bill. Do you see the difference.

    To make a cake you start with flour. You add in eggs, milk, etc. You don't add in the cake.

  7. #7
    jiang is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: add to and add in

    :)
    Dear Mike,

    I understand the difference better. However, there is still something that I don't understand. I hope my asking you further doesn't offend you.

    My question is what's the difference between 'add in the cost' and 'add in the bill'?

    I am looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    [quote="MikeNewYork"]
    Quote Originally Posted by jiang
    :D & :?

    Dear Mike,
    I understood most of your explanations. What I don't quite understand is 'add in'. I read a sentence in Longman dictionary of contemporary English: add sth in: to include something with something else: By the time we added in the cost of the drinks the bill was over pounds( pound should have been the symbol but I there isn't the symbol on my keyboard). What occurred to me is that there must be a difference between 'add to' and 'add in' here. So could you please kindly explain the meaning of the sentence in the dictionary? [/quoted]

    Yes, you can use "added in" in that way. You are "adding in" an item or an ingredient. You are not adding in the bill. Do you see the difference.

    To make a cake you start with flour. You add in eggs, milk, etc. You don't add in the cake.

  8. #8
    jiang is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: add to and add in


    Dear Mike,

    I didn't explain the differece between 'the cost' and 'the bill' just now because I was afraid I might make mistakes. But I should have tried even if my explanation is not correct.

    'cost' is like gredient, that is , you can add bit by bit. 'Bill' is the result of series of spendings. It is a whole thing which is inseperable. Am I right?

    Sorry I waste your time by replying twice.

    I am looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    [quote="MikeNewYork"]
    Quote Originally Posted by jiang
    :D & :?

    Dear Mike,
    I understood most of your explanations. What I don't quite understand is 'add in'. I read a sentence in Longman dictionary of contemporary English: add sth in: to include something with something else: By the time we added in the cost of the drinks the bill was over pounds( pound should have been the symbol but I there isn't the symbol on my keyboard). What occurred to me is that there must be a difference between 'add to' and 'add in' here. So could you please kindly explain the meaning of the sentence in the dictionary? [/quoted]

    Yes, you can use "added in" in that way. You are "adding in" an item or an ingredient. You are not adding in the bill. Do you see the difference.

    To make a cake you start with flour. You add in eggs, milk, etc. You don't add in the cake.

  9. #9
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
    MikeNewYork is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: add to and add in

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang

    Dear Mike,

    I didn't explain the differece between 'the cost' and 'the bill' just now because I was afraid I might make mistakes. But I should have tried even if my explanation is not correct.

    'cost' is like gredient, that is , you can add bit by bit. 'Bill' is the result of series of spendings. It is a whole thing which is inseperable. Am I right?

    Sorry I waste your time by replying twice.

    I am looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Please don't apologize. I am very proud of you. Don't be afraid to make mistakes here. That is why we are here.

    You are quite correct. The "bill" is the total, the end result. You can add in items and items can be added to it. But you can't add in the bill.

    If you have cake batter, you can add in ingredients and you can add things to the batter, but you can't add in the batter. :wink:

  10. #10
    jiang is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: add to and add in

    :D
    Dear Mike,

    Thank you very much for your encouragement and kindness. Now I understand it perfectly.

    :( The Internet station had broken for two days before it was fixed today so I wasn't able to reply.


    Jiang

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by jiang

    Dear Mike,

    I didn't explain the differece between 'the cost' and 'the bill' just now because I was afraid I might make mistakes. But I should have tried even if my explanation is not correct.

    'cost' is like gredient, that is , you can add bit by bit. 'Bill' is the result of series of spendings. It is a whole thing which is inseperable. Am I right?

    Sorry I waste your time by replying twice.

    I am looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Please don't apologize. I am very proud of you. Don't be afraid to make mistakes here. That is why we are here.

    You are quite correct. The "bill" is the total, the end result. You can add in items and items can be added to it. But you can't add in the bill.

    If you have cake batter, you can add in ingredients and you can add things to the batter, but you can't add in the batter. :wink:

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