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Thread: beard of bare

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    Default beard of bare

    I found this phrase, "Beard of Bare", beside a picture of one top-naked man, in a women magazine, and it seems strange for me. Shouldn't it be "Bare of Beard" Is it a style of writing article?

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    Default Re: beard of bare

    Quote Originally Posted by wendy
    I found this phrase, "Beard of Bare", beside a picture of one top-naked man, in a women magazine, and it seems strange for me. Shouldn't it be "Bare of Beard" Is it a style of writing article?
    I really don't know what it was supposed to mean. The word "beard" has a meaning of "one who is used to divert attention from someone else." It might be something like that.

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    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    If he was a particularly handsome man, it could be a cheap pun on 'bard', which is associated with Shakespeare, hence used to denote the best.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    If he was a particularly handsome man, it could be a cheap pun on 'bard', which is associated with Shakespeare, hence used to denote the best.
    I recently saw a play in New York called "The Beard of Avon". The idea was that Will Shakespeare was a country bumpkin who signed the plays for the real author.

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    Good name. Here, 'beard' is used for the marital partner of a gay person who doesn't want their sexuality to be known.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    Good name. Here, 'beard' is used for the marital partner of a gay person who doesn't want their sexuality to be known.
    That seems to be a strange use if the "beard" is a female. :wink:

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