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  1. #1
    aous02 is offline Member
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    Post Simple, Compound, and Complex sentence

    1) Is it true that the subject is never part of a prepositional phrase, or this is just what traditional grammarians claim?
    Eg 1: Neither of these boys (Want/Wants) to try a piece of .... (Accordingly, Once is the only correct choice)
    (in the same way):
    Eg 2: My dog, along with seven puppies, Has chewed..... (and not "have chewed"). Is this correct?

    2) Simple, Compound, and Complex sentences

    1. Lying exposed with its blanket of snow, the ice on the river melts quickly under the warm March sun.
    ( This sentence is described (I found it in the internet) as "Simple sentence"; however, I thought of "Lying exposed with its blanket of snow" as a dependent clause ( Adverbial clause of circumstance). If this is the case, it would be described as "Complex".
    May be "Lying exposed with its blanket of snow" is an adjectival phrase describing the ice. Ireally don't know.I'm somewhat baffled.Could you help me on this?

    2. He drives a Rolls-royce and his wife a mercedes.
    The second part is an independent clause with an ellipted verb "his wife (drives) a mercedes". Thus it's a compound sentence.
    A friend of mine told me that I should take it as it is. He told me it's a simple sentence.
    What do you think?

    3. He wondered how he was progressing? Is this a complex sentence?
    4. Rosen, her mouth stained with berries, came out of the park.
    In class, we treated it as simple sentence.
    * I think this is correct only if "her mouth stained with berries" is an adj phrase. It's not a clause, isn't it?

    Could you think of any fuzzy sentences?

  2. #2
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    Re: Simple, Compound, and Complex sentence

    Sorry? How is 'Once' the only correct choice here?

    1. Neither of these boys (Want/Wants) to try a piece of ...
    Below, the subject My dog is not inside a prepositional phrase:

    2. My dog, along with seven puppies, has chewed ...
    A clause has a subject and a verb. Where is the subject and verb here?

    3. Lying exposed with its blanket of snow, ...
    You're right: Lying exposed with its blanket of snow describes the noun the ice.

    A simple sentence has one main verb, a compound sentence has two or more main verbs. This sentence below has two main verbs:

    4. He drives a Rolls-royce and his wife (drives) a mercedes.
    How many main verbs do these sentences have?

    5. He wondered how he was progressing?
    6. Rosen, her mouth stained with berries, came out of the park.
    Quote Originally Posted by aous02
    Could you think of any fuzzy sentences?
    We don't do homework assignments.

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