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Thread: help!!!

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    blouen's Avatar
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    Question help!!!

    Can you tell me what humid means? as in the weather is very hot and humid...

    in my dictionary humid means "containing or characterized by a great deal of water vapor" or "Containing or characterized by a high amount of water or water vapor" and synonymous with "wet" but how could there be lots of water when it is HOT? as in summer...

    This I think is more of science but please I'm confused about this...
    Thanks!!!

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    Default Re: help!!!

    Ah, Blouen. Indeed, it's science.

    I imagine that the Philippenes has a rather humid climate, but I could be wrong. I can assure you that the heat of New Orleans in the summer (where it is VERY humid) feels very different than the heat of Arizona, where it is very dry. Personally, I find humidity much more unpleasant. There is an expression "It isn't the heat, it's the humidity." 27 degrees and humid is generally a lot more unfortable than 30 degrees and arid (dry).

    The sauna feels very different from the steam room, even if the temperature is the same.

    Other words that go with humid are "muggy" and "steamy."

    The warmer the air, the more water vapor it can hold. That is why you will get water on the outside of a glass containing an icy beverage. The relatively warm air in the room is holding water vapor - and then it hits the cold glass, and it cools down and has to "put" its water vapor somewhere, so it puts it on the glass.

    Relative humidity is how much water vapor the air has compared to how much it can hold. Humidity in the 90s is pretty unbearable.

    More than you wanted to know, I'm sure :D

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    Default Re: help!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Ah, Blouen. Indeed, it's science.

    I imagine that the Philippines has a rather humid climate, but I could be wrong. I can assure you that the heat of New Orleans in the summer (where it is VERY humid) feels very different than the heat of Arizona, where it is very dry. Personally, I find humidity much more unpleasant. There is an expression "It isn't the heat, it's the humidity." 27 degrees and humid is generally a lot more unfortable than 30 degrees and arid (dry).

    The sauna feels very different from the steam room, even if the temperature is the same.

    Other words that go with humid are "muggy" and "steamy."

    The warmer the air, the more water vapor it can hold. That is why you will get water on the outside of a glass containing an icy beverage. The relatively warm air in the room is holding water vapor - and then it hits the cold glass, and it cools down and has to "put" its water vapor somewhere, so it puts it on the glass.

    Relative humidity is how much water vapor the air has compared to how much it can hold. Humidity in the 90s is pretty unbearable.

    More than you wanted to know, I'm sure :D
    *** You mean humidity is the amount of vapor in our air.
    How can we notice it?

    Like here in the Philippines, it is pretty hot and I feel it when I'm out walking under the sun. I feel how more scorching the sun is now than last year when it hits my skin.

    But how would I know/feel the humidity without knowing the weather forecast?

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    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: help!!!

    You soon notice humidity - your hair goes limp and your clothes become damp. It is also more difficult to breath in high humidity. You can get hygrometers which will tell you what the humidity is.

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    Barb_D's Avatar
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    Default Re: help!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    your hair goes limp .
    I've been told that some people have hair that closely resembles a wild shrubbery when it's humid. Oh wait, that would be me.

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    Default Re: help!!!

    Then if the place is humid, it will be foggy when it gets cold. Am I right?

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    Default Re: help!!!

    It may get foggy if the temperature drops suddenly, or you may find dew on the grass.

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    Default Re: help!!!

    Or as my mother used to say, "Wear a warm coat ---this cold is penetrating." Summers in New Orleans are practically unbearable (I grew up there!) but the so-called "mild" winters are also surprisingly uncomfortable. A rainy 45 degree day can feel pretty miserable, even if it doesn't kill the tropical vegetation.

    High humidity in the summer feels so bad because your sweat can't evaporate as quickly to cool your body. Fairly recently, I think, the meteorologists came up with a "heat factor" to impress us with on summer days, calculated by some formula involving both heat and humidity. The idea is that listeners would regulate their amount of (potentially dangerous due to heat stroke, etc.) outdoor activity based on the "heat factor" number rather than just the temperature.

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    Default Re: help!!!

    So I think the Philippines, at least (is ir right to use "at least" here?) in the Manila where I stay, isn't humid after all... It's just so hot really, and my shirt gets damp because of my sweat coming out...
    It does get foggy in some places in the Philippines, in Bagiuo and in Tagaytay (where you can find the smallest volcano in the world).

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    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: help!!!

    This comes from the website for the Philippines Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration, and seems pretty conclusive that you do have humidity:

    The Climate of the Philippines is tropical and maritime. It is characterized by relatively high temperature, high humidity and abundant rainfall. It is similar in many respects to the climate of the countries of Central America. Temperature, humidity, and rainfall, which are discussed hereunder, are the most important elements of the country's weather and climate.

    Humidity

    Humidity refers to the moisture content of the atmosphere. Due to high temperature and the surrounding bodies of water, the Philippines has a high relative humidity. The average monthly relative humidity varies between 71 percent in March and 85 percent in September. The combination of warm temperature and high relative and absolute humidities give rise to high sensible temperature throughout the archipelago. It is especially uncomfortable during March to May, when temperature and humidity attain their maximum levels.


    If it is what you are used to, you probably won't recognize it. Here in England, we notice at once when the humidity is high (it is tonight and it is uncomfortable - hot and sticky).

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