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Thread: white out

  1. #1
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    Default white out

    Is whiteout countable?

    Can I say " Can I borrow your white out" or do I have to say" Can I borrow your bottle of white out

    If the white out is not in a bottle but a stick, do I say " stick of white out". "can I borrow your stick of white out?

    thank you

  2. #2
    Buddhaheart is offline Member
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    Default Re: white out

    Whiteout could mean an arctic weather condition in Canada and as such is countable.

    I suppose you can say "Can I borrow your white out?", "Can I borrow your bottle of white out?" or "Can I borrow your stick of white out?" I consider this a countable noun. Letís hear from others.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: white out

    Why, just a couple weeks ago, I asked our administrative assistant "When you place the next order, could you get me a white out?" And more than once, I have said, "Can I borrow your white out for a second?"

    It's probably a proper noun, and I probably should have said "Could you get me a bottle of correction fluid?" but in real life, "some white out" "your white out" etc. are commonly used.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: white out

    Barb is correct. A co-worker will understand what you mean if you simply say "Can I borrow your White-Out?" or "some White-Out."

    Trivia tidbit: Did you know that Bette Nesmith, mother of Monkee Michael Nesmith, invented Liquid Paper?

  5. #5
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    Default Re: white out

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    Barb is correct. A co-worker will understand what you mean if you simply say "Can I borrow your White-Out?" or "some White-Out."

    ...
    I'd understand it, and consider it countable, even though in the UK the relevant trade names are Snopake and Tippex.

    b

  6. #6
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    Default Re: white out

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post

    Trivia tidbit: Did you know that Bette Nesmith, mother of Monkee Michael Nesmith, invented Liquid Paper?
    You learn something new here EVERY day!

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