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Thread: borrow

  1. #11
    Lenka is offline Senior Member
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    Re: borrow

    Quote Originally Posted by Jason72 View Post
    No need to thank me!
    I've registered and downloaded the exam, but I need a password for extracting. Do you have it?
    Yes, the password is "englishtips.org" (the password is used for all the downloads there).

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    If it's older, it may be "thinking" that phones are attached to the walls in our homes, and thus you don't "borrow" one by taking it with you.
    Aha ... You're probably right.... This is the older edition (there is a new one available too, but I don't have it at home) and it was published in 1988. However, the edition I own was published in 2000... They didn't apparently improve the tests (they just added 10 new tests).

    Quote Originally Posted by Delmobile View Post
    Yes, that has got to be it.

    They should keep up with the times. Will this outfit also be teaching Lenka to say, "You're the bee's knees" or "That's not quite cricket"?
    What does it mean?

  2. #12
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Re: borrow

    Bee's knees - idiom still used fairly frequently in BE, meaning 'very good/best'
    Not cricket - idiom rather dated even in BE, meaning 'bending or breaking not the rules but the spirit of fair play in any context [not just cricket]'. It's still used, but in a spirit of gentle mockery of someone's old-fashioned fairness: Old George wouldn't read a fellow's diary, even if it was lying open on the desk - it wouldn't be cricket. There are many variants of 'not cricket': just not cricket, not quite cricket, hardly cricket... but always 'cricket'.

  3. #13
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    Re: borrow

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    If it's older, it may be "thinking" that phones are attached to the walls in our homes, and thus you don't "borrow" one by taking it with you.
    Even modern landline phones: the base is attached, plugged into the wall.

    The semantics are tricky on that one, Lenka. Both use or borrow work.

    Nice example question.

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