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  1. #1
    retro's Avatar
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    Default readjust to vs get used/accustomed to

    I was wondering if readjust, get used/accustomed to are synonymous or readjust can only refer to actions that you have already done but for some reason you have to learn it again.

    Examples:

    1. Josh has divorced; once again he has to readjust to living alone. (Does readjust only fit here or the other 2 options are fine too?)

    2. Having won the Wimbledon title, he has to get used/accustomed to a lot of media attention. (would readjust also fix the context?)

  2. #2
    Trisia is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: readjust to vs get used/accustomed to

    Hello, [I AM NOT A TEACHER :)]


    Sentence #1 sounds like John has been divorced before, because you used "again". The prefix "re" already contains the idea of something happening again. Try:

    1. Josh divorced his wife. He has to readjust to living alone/life as a batchelor (like before he got married).
    Josh got divorced. He's going to have to get used to living alone again.

    I don't particularly like your second sentence, using "accustomed to". Sounds a bit strange to me, but then again, I'm a non-native.

    Maybe others can help more :)
    Last edited by Trisia; 18-Jun-2007 at 20:30.

  3. #3
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: readjust to vs get used/accustomed to

    Quote Originally Posted by retro View Post
    I was wondering if readjust, get used/accustomed to are synonymous or readjust can only refer to actions that you have already done but for some reason you have to learn it again.

    Examples:

    1. Josh has divorced; once again he has to readjust to living alone. (Does readjust only fit here or the other 2 options are fine too?) Delete "once again" and your sentence is fine. If you leave the phrase in, then "get used to" will be fine. "accustomed" in this context needs "become" in front of it.

    2. Having won the Wimbledon title, he has to get used/become accustomed to a lot of media attention. Either phrase is fine (would readjust also fix the context?)No, it cannot be used here as [unless there is a different context] this is the first time he has won the tournament.
    I don't see these three terms as synonymous.
    "Readjust" implies going back to something already learned/experienced.
    "Get used to" and "Become accustomed to" are more nearly synonymous, meaning that you will learn to accept whatever it is for the first time.

  4. #4
    retro's Avatar
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    Default Re: readjust to vs get used/accustomed to

    1. Josh has divorced; once again he has to readjust to living alone. (Does readjust only fit here or the other 2 options are fine too?) Delete "once again" and your sentence is fine. If you leave the phrase in, then "get used to" will be fine. "accustomed" in this context needs "become" in front of it.
    My (Oxford) dictionary contains the following:
    "Once again he had to readjust to living alone."

    What do you think?

    2. Having won the Wimbledon title, he has to get used/become accustomed to a lot of media attention. Either phrase is fine (would readjust also fix the context?)No, it cannot be used here as [unless there is a different context] this is the first time he has won the tournament.
    How about this context?
    Having won the Wimbledon title after three years of absence from tennis, he has to readjust to media attention.

    Thank you

    Last edited by retro; 18-Jun-2007 at 21:15.

  5. #5
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: readjust to vs get used/accustomed to

    Hmm - but the dictionary does not give your first sentence - Josh has divorced. Trisia rightly commented that including "once again" implied that this was not the first time that Josh has been divorced. Let's look at an alternative context:

    For the second time, Josh has been widowed/divorced. Once again he has to readjust to living alone.

    As to the second sentence, I will grudgingly allow you "readjust" with your new context, but I think you are straining to make it possible to use it.

  6. #6
    retro's Avatar
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    Default Re: readjust to vs get used/accustomed to

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    Hmm - but the dictionary does not give your first sentence - Josh has divorced. Trisia rightly commented that including "once again" implied that this was not the first time that Josh has been divorced. Let's look at an alternative context:

    For the second time, Josh has been widowed/divorced. Once again he has to readjust to living alone.


    All right.

    There remains one question though. The definition by my dictionary is: to get used to a changed or new situation. Although "re" in "readjust" may imply a second experience, IMO the definition should include "again". A first experience as well as a second one can be considered as a changed or new situation. (John has divorced; this is the first time he's been a divorcÚ). Thus, without more context, "Once again he had to readjust to living alone" at first glance can suggest this is his first divorce and the definition without "again" is misleading - at least to me.



    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    As to the second sentence, I will grudgingly allow you "readjust" with your new context, but I think you are straining to make it possible to use it.
    Since you said it needed a different context for "readjust" to fix it I've just rewritten it.
    Last edited by retro; 19-Jun-2007 at 01:53.

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