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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    Default walking through the snow, on the snow

    After walking through the snow, my feet were freezing.
    After walking on the snow, my feet was freezing.

    What is the difference in meaning between these sentences?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
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    Default Re: walking through the snow, on the snow

    Through means your feet are in the snow; on means your feet are on top of the snow, on the snow's surface, not inside it.

    Does that help?

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