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  1. #1
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Which is proper?

    Is it a handicapped ramp? Or is it a handicap ramp?
    We've been round and round at work about it.
    Thank you.
    Rebecca

  2. #2
    Buddhaheart is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
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    Default Re: Which is proper?

    I think you meant a ramp for the handicapped or handicapped people?

    If so, it’s more like a ‘handicap ramp’. However, I won’t quite write it that way. It does sound right. I would say ‘a ramp for the handicapped or handicapped people’ or ‘handicapped people’s ramp’.

    A ‘handicapped’ ramp is one that is somehow or somewhat ‘handicapped’, deficient, defective, unusable or ‘disadvantaged’!? I don’t think that’s what you meant. At least I won’t describe a defective ramp that way.

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