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  1. #1
    wendy Guest

    Default I don't get it #3

    Quote Originally Posted by I
    A "It's sad, isn't it? All these older guys partying way past their prime."

    B "It's sad, isn't it? All these older guys, partying way past their prime."

    C "It's sad, isn't it? All these older guys still partying way past their prime."

    D "It's sad, isn't it? All these older guys, still partying way past their prime."

    Is sentence "c" ungrammartical??

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Is sentence "C" ungrammartical?
    ==> It's grammatical. The adverb 'still' modifies the adjective 'partying'

    1. So adverb [still] can be placed before participle phrase??

    2.Way in older guys, partying way past their prime mean what, and modify what in the sentence??

  2. #2
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    1. So adverb [still] can be placed before participle phrase??
    Still is usually placed before the verb (in this case partying), except for the verb to be, even if it used as an auxiliary verb. If the verb to be is being used as an auxiliary verb, it will be caught between the auxiliary and the main verb.
    examples:
    I am still here.
    I still have the book.
    We still haven't gone.

    And yes, it can be followed by a participe phrase and many other types of phrases as well.


    2.Way in older guys, partying way past their prime mean what, and modify what in the sentence??

    Way, in this sentence means "very much" and it is modifying the word "past". therefore. the men are very much past their prime, they are too old for this type of behavior.

  3. #3
    wendy Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by queenmaabd
    1. So adverb [still] can be placed before participle phrase??
    Still is usually placed before the verb (in this case partying), except for the verb to be, even if it used as an auxiliary verb. If the verb to be is being used as an auxiliary verb, it will be caught between the auxiliary and the main verb.
    examples:
    I am still here.
    I still have the book.
    We still haven't gone.

    And yes, it can be followed by a participe phrase and many other types of phrases as well.


    2.Way in older guys, partying way past their prime mean what, and modify what in the sentence??

    Way, in this sentence means "very much" and it is modifying the word "past". therefore. the men are very much past their prime, they are too old for this type of behavior.

    1.the word "past" in this sentence is "adj" or "adv" or "verb"?? which word does it modify??

    2.I'm not good at English. I always thought that the sentence means "the older guys are going to be too old to party". I don't understand, what is the key word that make us know that the sentence means "they are too old for this type of behavior".

    3.If the sentence "these older guys, still partying way past their prime" means "these older guys, who are still partying, are way past their prime"why don't it has the word "are"??

    4.If it is the same as "these older guys way past their prime, still partying"

  4. #4
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    1.the word "past" in this sentence is "adj" or "adv" or "verb"?? which word does it modify??

    In this sentence, past is functioning as a preposition (of time)

    dictionary.com
    prep.
    Beyond in time; later than or after: past midnight; a quarter past two.
    Beyond in position; farther than: The house is a mile past the first stoplight. They walked past the memorial in silence.

    Beyond the power, scope, extent, or influence of: The problem is past the point of resolution.
    Beyond in development or appropriateness: The child is past drinking from a bottle. You're past sucking your thumb, so don't do it.
    Beyond the number or amount of: The child couldn't count past 20.


    2.I'm not good at English. I always thought that the sentence means "the older guys are going to be too old to party". I don't understand, what is the key word that make us know that the sentence means "they are too old for this type of behavior".

    "They are way past their prime" simply means that their "prime", their ideal age for this type of activities, is in the past. So they are already too old for this type of activities.


    3.If the sentence "these older guys, still partying way past their prime" means "these older guys, who are still partying, are way past their prime"why don't it has the word "are"??

    The only reason I can think of for that one is an informal use. Any other suggestions?

  5. #5
    wendy Guest

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    3.If the sentence "these older guys, still partying way past their prime" means "these older guys, who are still partying, are way past their prime"why don't it has the word "are"??

    The only reason I can think of for that one is an informal use. Any other suggestions?
    1. So it doesn't have are because it's informal, right??

    2.Can you please rewrite the sentence to be formal for me??

    3. Is it the same as "these older guys way past their prime, still partying"??

  6. #6
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    It's not really a question of formality- we sometimes replace a phrase with a relative pronoun with a participle to make it shorter and more concise.

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