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  1. #1
    P. Fogg Guest

    Default Two idioms-same meaning?

    Do these two idioms have the same meaning?

    1. to be as pleased as Punch
    2. to be as merry as a lark

    Which one is more common

    Thank you in advance and best regards.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Two idioms-same meaning?

    Quote Originally Posted by P. Fogg
    Do these two idioms have the same meaning?

    1. to be as pleased as Punch
    2. to be as merry as a lark

    Which one is more common

    Thank you in advance and best regards.
    I am not sure if I've ever heard of " to be merry as a lark."

    :wink:

  3. #3
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
    MikeNewYork is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: Two idioms-same meaning?

    Quote Originally Posted by P. Fogg
    Do these two idioms have the same meaning?

    1. to be as pleased as Punch
    2. to be as merry as a lark

    Which one is more common

    Thank you in advance and best regards.
    They both involve happiness, but the first is usually about something specific. The second is more of a general tendency.

    I am as pleased as punch to see you.
    Oh, you know John. He's as merry as a lark/happy as a pig in slop.

    I don't find either to be very common. The first was often used by Hubert Horatio Humphrey, a Minnesota politician and former Vice-President of the US (with Lyndon Johnson, 1964-1968).

  4. #4
    P. Fogg Guest

    Default Re: Two idioms-same meaning?

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by P. Fogg
    Do these two idioms have the same meaning?

    1. to be as pleased as Punch
    2. to be as merry as a lark

    Which one is more common

    Thank you in advance and best regards.
    They both involve happiness, but the first is usually about something specific. The second is more of a general tendency.

    I am as pleased as punch to see you.
    Oh, you know John. He's as merry as a lark/happy as a pig in slop.

    I don't find either to be very common. The first was often used by Hubert Horatio Humphrey, a Minnesota politician and former Vice-President of the US (with Lyndon Johnson, 1964-1968).
    Could you tell me a more common one that involves happiness?

    P. Fogg

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    MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    Default Re: Two idioms-same meaning?

    Quote Originally Posted by P. Fogg
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by P. Fogg
    Do these two idioms have the same meaning?

    1. to be as pleased as Punch
    2. to be as merry as a lark

    Which one is more common

    Thank you in advance and best regards.
    They both involve happiness, but the first is usually about something specific. The second is more of a general tendency.

    I am as pleased as punch to see you.
    Oh, you know John. He's as merry as a lark/happy as a pig in slop.

    I don't find either to be very common. The first was often used by Hubert Horatio Humphrey, a Minnesota politician and former Vice-President of the US (with Lyndon Johnson, 1964-1968).
    Could you tell me a more common one that involves happiness?

    P. Fogg
    Well, "happy as a pig in slop/shit" is one. Be careful about the "shit" version -- it's not for polite company. :wink:

  6. #6
    P. Fogg Guest

    Default Re: Two idioms-same meaning?

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by P. Fogg
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by P. Fogg
    Do these two idioms have the same meaning?

    1. to be as pleased as Punch
    2. to be as merry as a lark

    Which one is more common

    Thank you in advance and best regards.
    They both involve happiness, but the first is usually about something specific. The second is more of a general tendency.

    I am as pleased as punch to see you.
    Oh, you know John. He's as merry as a lark/happy as a pig in slop.

    I don't find either to be very common. The first was often used by Hubert Horatio Humphrey, a Minnesota politician and former Vice-President of the US (with Lyndon Johnson, 1964-1968).
    Could you tell me a more common one that involves happiness?

    P. Fogg
    Well, "happy as a pig in slop/shit" is one. Be careful about the "shit" version -- it's not for polite company. :wink:
    Thank you for your quick answer. :D

    P. Fogg

  7. #7
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    Default Re: Two idioms-same meaning?

    Quote Originally Posted by P. Fogg
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by P. Fogg
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by P. Fogg
    Do these two idioms have the same meaning?

    1. to be as pleased as Punch
    2. to be as merry as a lark

    Which one is more common

    Thank you in advance and best regards.
    They both involve happiness, but the first is usually about something specific. The second is more of a general tendency.

    I am as pleased as punch to see you.
    Oh, you know John. He's as merry as a lark/happy as a pig in slop.

    I don't find either to be very common. The first was often used by Hubert Horatio Humphrey, a Minnesota politician and former Vice-President of the US (with Lyndon Johnson, 1964-1968).
    Could you tell me a more common one that involves happiness?

    P. Fogg
    Well, "happy as a pig in slop/shit" is one. Be careful about the "shit" version -- it's not for polite company. :wink:
    Thank you for your quick answer. :D

    P. Fogg
    You're welcome. :wink:

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    Default Re: Two idioms-same meaning?

    Quote Originally Posted by P. Fogg
    Do these two idioms have the same meaning?
    1. to be as pleased as Punch
    2. to be as merry as a lark

    3. happy as a box of birds
    4. happy as a clam
    5. happy as a flea at a dog show
    6. happy as Larry


    Questions.
    1. Are they with the same meanings?
    2. Can I say "You smile like a clam."
    3. P.Fogg mentioned a phrase here "as pleased as Punch". Is it related to Punch and Judy show? A traditional children's entertainment in which a man, Mr Punch, argues with his wife, Judy. It was especially popular in the past as an entertainment in British towns by the sea in summer. (from dictionary cambridge website)


    Well...curiosity kills sabrina.

    Thank you in advance.

  9. #9
    P. Fogg Guest

    Default Re: Two idioms-same meaning?

    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Quote Originally Posted by P. Fogg
    Do these two idioms have the same meaning?
    1. to be as pleased as Punch
    2. to be as merry as a lark

    3. happy as a box of birds
    4. happy as a clam
    5. happy as a flea at a dog show
    6. happy as Larry


    Questions.
    1. Are they with the same meanings?
    2. Can I say "You smile like a clam."
    3. P.Fogg mentioned a phrase here "as pleased as Punch". Is it related to Punch and Judy show? A traditional children's entertainment in which a man, Mr Punch, argues with his wife, Judy. It was especially popular in the past as an entertainment in British towns by the sea in summer. (from dictionary cambridge website)

    Well...curiosity kills sabrina.

    Thank you in advance.
    My dictionary shows a relation between the phrase an the show.

    P. Fogg

  10. #10
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    Default Re: Two idioms-same meaning?

    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Quote Originally Posted by P. Fogg
    Do these two idioms have the same meaning?
    1. to be as pleased as Punch
    2. to be as merry as a lark

    3. happy as a box of birds
    4. happy as a clam
    5. happy as a flea at a dog show
    6. happy as Larry


    Questions.
    1. Are they with the same meanings?
    2. Can I say "You smile like a clam."
    3. P.Fogg mentioned a phrase here "as pleased as Punch". Is it related to Punch and Judy show? A traditional children's entertainment in which a man, Mr Punch, argues with his wife, Judy. It was especially popular in the past as an entertainment in British towns by the sea in summer. (from dictionary cambridge website)


    Well...curiosity kills sabrina.

    Thank you in advance.
    1. I've heard #4 and #5.

    Also "happy as a kid in a candy store".

    2. Never heard that.

    3. Very possible. :wink:

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