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  1. #1
    albertino is offline Senior Member
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    Default When "To" is used as a preposition rather than an infinitive?

    May I ask if the using of "to + gerund" is correct in the sentence?

    "In parallel to this, teachers should be given enough room to establishing a collaborative mechanism under administrative arrangements, so that they can conduct teaching discussions at the same period of time and make plans for the school-based curriculum."

    And is there any way to test whether the "to" is a preposition or an infinitive in a sentence?

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    engee30 is offline Key Member
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    Wink Re: When "To" is used as a preposition rather than an infinitive?

    Quote Originally Posted by albertino View Post
    May I ask if the using of "to + gerund" is correct in the sentence?

    "In parallel to this, teachers should be given enough room to establishing a collaborative mechanism under administrative arrangements, so that they can conduct teaching discussions at the same period of time and make plans for the school-based curriculum."
    Well, to my way of thinking, the sentence with the to used as a preposition is fine as well as it is with the to-infinitive.

    In parallel to this, teachers should be given enough room to establish (= so that they can establish) a collaborative mechanism under administrative arrangements, so that they can conduct teaching discussions at the same period of time and make plans for the school-based curriculum.

    In parallel to this, teachers should be given enough room to establishing (= enough room with the possibility of establishing) a collaborative mechanism under administrative arrangements, so that they can conduct teaching discussions at the same period of time and make plans for the school-based curriculum.

    Quote Originally Posted by albertino View Post
    And is there any way to test whether the "to" is a preposition or an infinitive in a sentence?
    You can tell that it's the preposition that is used, not the to-infinitive, because all prepositions take the gerund form of the verb.
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  3. #3
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    engee30 is offline Key Member
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    Unhappy Re: When "To" is used as a preposition rather than an infinitive?

    Quote Originally Posted by Niall Beag View Post
    No, sorry, that isn't natural English.
    Níall
    Grammar grad and trainee teacher.
    I do believe you - I'm not English, I'm afraid.

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    engee30 is offline Key Member
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    Wink Re: When "To" is used as a preposition rather than an infinitive?

    Quote Originally Posted by Niall Beag View Post
    Argh! Why does everyone think it's only Sassenachs that speak the language?

    Níall,
    Proud Scot.
    Let me correct myself then - I do believe you, for I am not British!

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    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: When "To" is used as a preposition rather than an infinitive?

    Quote Originally Posted by Niall Beag View Post
    Argh! Why does everyone think it's only Sassenachs that speak the language?

    Níall,
    Proud Scot.
    Because they can understand us?

  6. #6
    Jason72 is offline Banned
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    Default Re: When "To" is used as a preposition rather than an infinitive?

    Quote Originally Posted by engee30 View Post
    Let me correct myself then - I do believe you, for I am not British!
    Sassenach - English person, British person... It's all the same...

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    Default Re: When "To" is used as a preposition rather than an infinitive?

    Sassenachs ? Do they have anything to do with Anglo-Saxons ?

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    Jason72 is offline Banned
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    Default Re: When "To" is used as a preposition rather than an infinitive?

    Sassenach is the Scots' term for an English person.

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    Default Re: When "To" is used as a preposition rather than an infinitive?

    Quote Originally Posted by Niall Beag View Post
    No, in that case it should be to establish. I can't explain why, but I'll think about it and get back to you if I can....
    It's in the verb's subcategorization frame:
    give + someone + something to do.
    Active: The school should give teachers enough room to do something.

    Passive: Teachers should be given enough room to do something.


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    albertino, there is a way to test whether to functions as a preposition or a particle.

    If to is short for towards, it's a preposition:

    preposition
    10 steps to establishing a fund
    10 steps towards establish a fund
    If to is short for in order to, it's a particle:

    particle

    Teachers should be given enough room in order to establish a collaborative mechanism.

    Teachers should be given enough room to establish a collaborative mechanism.
    ______________

    engee30, to establishing does indeed work here--at least in my dialect.
    ... teachers should be given enough room towards establishing a collaborative mechanism ...

    ... teachers should be given enough room to establishing a collaborative mechanism ...
    But given that to is ambiguous in that position; i.e., to(wards); (in order) to, a good writer would have spelt/spelled out the word towards.

    In sum, the particle lead infinitive to establish has my vote.

  10. #10
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    engee30 is offline Key Member
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    Thumbs up Re: When "To" is used as a preposition rather than an infinitive?

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    engee30, to establishing does indeed work here--at least in my dialect.
    ... teachers should be given enough room towards establishing a collaborative mechanism ...

    ... teachers should be given enough room to establishing a collaborative mechanism ...
    But given that to is ambiguous in that position; i.e., to(wards); (in order) to, a good writer would have spelt/spelled out the word towards.
    That's true. Let me show another two sentences that are similar, yet different to each other, with a little change in meaning (the change that you provided, Casiopea, I guess):

    Two-way trade with foreign nations is the only really practical way to (= in order to) achieve peace on this earth.
    Nixon is well on the way to (= towards) achieving a historic reconstruction of the postal service.

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    In sum, the particle lead infinitive to establish has my vote.
    I opt for the same.

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