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  1. #1
    wendy Guest

    Default Don't forget who's taking you home


    You can dance every dance with the guy who gives you the eye
    Let him hold you tight
    You can smile every smile for the man who held your hand
    'Neath the pale moonlight
    But Don't forget who's taking you home
    And in whose arms you're gonna be
    So darling, save the last dance for me

    1. Is the sentence Don't forget who's taking you home means he is driving her home now or he will come to take her home soon??

    2. If it means he will come to take her home soon. I know that we can use present continuous tense for fixed things in the future like appointments, but I thought that it must have the time wrtten in the sentence such as I'm leaving for London next sunday, Isn't it important??

  2. #2
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    Default Re: Don't forget who's taking you home

    [quote="wendy"]

    You can dance every dance with the guy who gives you the eye
    Let him hold you tight
    You can smile every smile for the man who held your hand
    'Neath the pale moonlight
    But Don't forget who's taking you home
    And in whose arms you're gonna be
    So darling, save the last dance for me

    1. Is the sentence Don't forget who's taking you home means he is driving her home now or he will come to take her home soon??
    It means that it has already been decided that the singer is taking her home. This is presumably because he brought her there.

    2. If it means he will come to take her home soon. I know that we can use present continuous tense for fixed things in the future like appointments, but I thought that it must have the time wrtten in the sentence such as I'm leaving for London next sunday, Isn't it important??
    The present tense there is to show confidence in the statement. :wink:

  3. #3
    wendy Guest

    Default Re: Don't forget who's taking you home

    I'm sorry, still don't understand...

    1.The sentence "don't forget who's taking your home" is in which below case??

    THE PRESENT CONTINUOUS TENSE:

    Usage:


    A: to describe something happening now or for a limited time in the future.
    e.g. Mary is working today.


    B: to describe an expected or unexpected event that happens frequently and uses the adverb always:
    e.g. The teacher is always shouting at his class.



    C: to make appointments and arrangements using go/come:
    e.g. I am going to the dentist at 9 a.m..(not I go)



    D: to describe an event that is to happen and where the sentence includes a word/phrase with limited future meaning:

    on Monday, on Tuesday etc.. in June, in July etc..
    this afternoon, this evening, tomorrow etc.. next week, next month, next year etc..

    e.g. Michael is buying a new car next Tuesday
    .

    2. In my opinion it is the case D. If I was right that it is the case D, why don't the sentence "don't forget who's taking your home" include a word/phrase with limited future meaning??

  4. #4
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    Default Re: Don't forget who's taking you home

    Quote Originally Posted by wendy
    I'm sorry, still don't understand...

    1.The sentence "don't forget who's taking your home" is in which below case??

    THE PRESENT CONTINUOUS TENSE:

    Usage:


    A: to describe something happening now or for a limited time in the future.
    e.g. Mary is working today.


    B: to describe an expected or unexpected event that happens frequently and uses the adverb always:
    e.g. The teacher is always shouting at his class.



    C: to make appointments and arrangements using go/come:
    e.g. I am going to the dentist at 9 a.m..(not I go)



    D: to describe an event that is to happen and where the sentence includes a word/phrase with limited future meaning:

    on Monday, on Tuesday etc.. in June, in July etc..
    this afternoon, this evening, tomorrow etc.. next week, next month, next year etc..

    e.g. Michael is buying a new car next Tuesday
    .

    2. In my opinion it is the case D. If I was right that it is the case D, why don't the sentence "don't forget who's taking your home" include a word/phrase with limited future meaning??
    It is somewhere between C and D. Because the gentlemen took this girl to the dance, he has an expectation/arrangement whereby he will take her home after the dance. This even will happen in the limited future. It is understood that the "taking home" will occur when the dance/evening is over.

  5. #5
    wendy Guest

    Default Re: Don't forget who's taking you home

    It is somewhere between C and D. Because the gentlemen took this girl to the dance, he has an expectation/arrangement whereby he will take her home after the dance. This event will happen in the limited future. It is understood that the "taking home" will occur when the dance/evening is over.

    1. Why don't the sentence "don't forget who's taking your home" include a word/phrase with limited future meaning??

    e.g. I am going to the dentist at 9 a.m
    e.g. Michael is buying a new car next Tuesday.


    2. what is limited future meaning means, Isn't it mean the specific time which is written in the sentence??

  6. #6
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    Default Re: Don't forget who's taking you home

    [quote="wendy"]
    It is somewhere between C and D. Because the gentlemen took this girl to the dance, he has an expectation/arrangement whereby he will take her home after the dance. This event will happen in the limited future. It is understood that the "taking home" will occur when the dance/evening is over.

    1. Why don't the sentence "don't forget who's taking your home" include a word/phrase with limited future meaning??

    e.g. I am going to the dentist at 9 a.m
    e.g. Michael is buying a new car next Tuesday.
    In the dance scenario, the context makes it unnecessary. If the man and the woman were sitiing in the car, he would be taking her home as he spoke. As it is, they are still at the dance. The timing adverb "after the dance" is understood in that case.

    The same would be true in your other examples if you change the context.

    John is sitiing in his office complaining about a toothache. His coworker says. "Complaining will not help. You need to see a dentist." John says "I am going to the dentist". The context suggests that he means "soon", "today", etc.

    A: Why is Michael asking so many questions about mileage statistics in new cars.
    B: Michael is buying a car (soon, in the near future).

    2. what is limited future meaning means, Isn't it mean the specific time which is written in the sentence??
    These time references can be implied by context.

  7. #7
    wendy Guest

    Default Re: Don't forget who's taking you home

    So the limited future meaning means the specific time which is written in the sentence such as 9.00 pm or next sunday, etc.., right??

  8. #8
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    Default Re: Don't forget who's taking you home

    Quote Originally Posted by wendy
    So the limited future meaning means the specific time which is written in the sentence such as 9.00 pm or next sunday, etc.., right??
    That's the way the rule reads. Rules are generalities. When the time clue is implied, it is "in the sentence" in a non-written form. :wink:

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