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  1. #1
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    Default indirect object or adverb of place

    sir,
    I want to know the diffirence of the DIRECT OBJECT and the PLACE OF ADVERB.


    "He threw the ball on his head bady"

    in this sentence :-

    the ball = "direct object"

    on his head = "indirect object or place of adverb"

    thanks.

  2. #2
    Barb_D's Avatar
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    Default Re: indirect object or adverb of place

    Praveen, this is a difficult sentence to analyze because it doesn't really make sense.

    He threw the ball - yes "the ball" is the direct object.

    But "on his head badly" doesn't make sense. Do you mean he was standing on his head when he threw? No wonder he threw badly.

    Can you try this with a different sentence?

    -- not a teacher

  3. #3
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    Default Re: indirect object or adverb of place

    praveen, first, and to agree with Barb-D, a ball is thrown at someone's head, not on someone's head.
    Ex: Max threw the ball at Sam's head.

    Second, an indirect object is usually the 'receiver' of an action described by a verb:
    Ex: Max threw me the ball. <indirect object>

    Verbs like throw are called ditransitive verbs. They take two objects: a direct object (DO) and an indirect object (IO). The objects of most ditransitive verbs can be repositioned, or undergo what appears to be a positional switch. The IO becomes an adverbial phrase:
    Ex: Max threw the ball to me. <adverbial phrase>

    To me functions as an adverbial phrase; it tells us where Max threw the ball. The same holds true here:
    Ex: Max threw the ball at Sam's head. <adverbial phrase>

    Note, however, if we turn the adverbial phrase at Sam's head into an IO, the meaning changes:
    Ex: Max threw Sam's head the ball. <indirect object>
    Sam's head is either decapitated or it has the ability to catch a ball.
    Lastly, there's a lot to be said about the function and distribution of the adverbs badly and poorly--which I am most certain our members will bring up--but as for adverb placement in general, these are your options:

    Ex: Happily, Max threw the ball at Sam's head.
    Ex: Max happily threw the ball at Sam's head.
    Ex: Max threw the ball happily at Sam's head.
    Ex: Max threw the ball at Sam's head, happily.


    Does that help?

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