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  1. english001's Avatar

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    #1

    Question Differrence and Usage of..??

    I'd like to ask about the right usage of these Wrods:

    1. Gone??
    2. Been??

    Please explain the when can I use it in a sentence and kindly give out some examples too.

    Thanks!!


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    #2

    Re: Differrence and Usage of..??

    I think what you would like to know is the difference between senteces like
    I have been in France
    and
    I have gone to France
    .

    If this is what you want to know, the first one means you have spent some time in France (on holyday, on business...) but you have now returned home, while the second one implies you still are in France.

    [I'm a student and non-native speaker. A teacher will give you a better explanation.]

  2. blouen's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Differrence and Usage of..??

    I hear they're interchangeable.


    [ an avid English learner]


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    #4

    Re: Differrence and Usage of..??

    Quote Originally Posted by blouen View Post
    I hear they're interchangeable.


    [ an avid English learner]
    This is what I was taught. It may be wrong, of course. But if you think about it, you can see the differences between them.
    Present perfect implies the consequences of the action are still evident at the present time. So if you say I have gone to France, you are implicitly saying you are still in France. While if you say I have been in France, you are just saying you went there at an unspecified time in the past.


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    #5

    Re: Differrence and Usage of..??

    Quote Originally Posted by blouen View Post
    I hear they're interchangeable.


    [ an avid English learner]
    I've gone to France. - I had a flight yesterday, and now I'm in France. I'll be back to London in a month.
    I've been in France. - I've been there yesterday, but today I'm back to London.

    Is it clear now?

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Differrence and Usage of..??

    Quote Originally Posted by blouen View Post
    I hear they're interchangeable.


    [ an avid English learner]

    been = been and come back
    gone = gone and not come back

    Present perfect / past simple clarifies whether 'gone' is permanent or not. So in these examples -
    Quote Originally Posted by Englishlanguage View Post
    I think what you would like to know is the difference between senteces like
    I have been in France
    and
    I have gone to France
    .

    If this is what you want to know, the first one means you have spent some time in France (on holyday, on business...) but you have now returned home, while the second one implies you still are in France.

    [I'm a student and non-native speaker. A teacher will give you a better explanation.]
    ...
    the first refers to having been in France and come back and the second (rather rare) refers to having gone and not come back (yet, possibly).

    Examples:

    'I've been trying to contact you for weeks.'
    'Didn't my secretary tell you? I've been in France.'

    "Have gone" (unlike "has gone") is quite rare. (It requires the 'speaker' to be both present and absent. Imagine you are looking for someone, and go round to their house. They've left a message there: "I have gone to France." In the 3rd person - "has gone" - it's common. "If you want to speak to John, you're too late. He has gone to France." If the going is permanent, the simple past makes this clear: "If you want to speak to John, you've missed your chance. He went to France last week, and he won't be coming back."



    b

  4. blouen's Avatar
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    #7

    Thumbs up Re: Differrence and Usage of..??

    It's clear now, thanks!!

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Differrence and Usage of..??

    Quote Originally Posted by blouen View Post
    It's clear now, thanks!!
    Good

    When I said
    If the going is permanent, the simple past makes this clear: "If you want to speak to John, you've missed your chance. He went to France last week, and he won't be coming back."
    ... I hope you didn't get the idea that the simple past always refers to a final and absolute absence being implied by "gone". Of course, variations like this are possible:

    He went to France last week, and he won't be back until tomorrow.

    b

  6. blouen's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Differrence and Usage of..??

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Good

    When I said

    ... I hope you didn't get the idea that the simple past always refers to a final and absolute absence being implied by "gone". Of course, variations like this are possible:
    He went to France last week, and he won't be back until tomorrow.
    b
    No, I didn't and everything's fine! "He went to work and won't be home until 2pm."

  7. RonBee's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Differrence and Usage of..??

    BobK, that was an excellent explanation.

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