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  1. #1
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    Default leave a bad taste in your mouth.

    Hello, dear teachers,

    leave a bad taste in your mouth. Don't get it.

    sabrina

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    If something unpleasant happens, and people feel uncomfortable about it, it is said to leave a bad taste.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: leave a bad taste in your mouth.

    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Hello, dear teachers,

    leave a bad taste in your mouth. Don't get it.

    sabrina
    This idiom focuses on the lingering effect of unpleasantness. Some foods taste bad, but the bad taste go away quickly. Other foods leave a bad taste for a period of time. When this idiom is applied to things other than food, it is about the lingering bad taste.

    We had been dating for two months and I liked him very much. Monday night we went out and he became drunk and abusive. He has called me ten times since but I haven't returned his phone calls. His behavior on Monday left a bad taste in my mouth.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    If something unpleasant happens, and people feel uncomfortable about it, it is said to leave a bad taste.
    I checked this idiom on dictionary cambridge website.
    leave a bad taste in your mouth

    Definition
    if an experience leaves a bad taste in your mouth, you have an unpleasant memory of it
    I think we all felt that he'd been treated unfairly and it left a bad taste in people's mouths.
    Here, it refers to "he'd been treated unfairly", does it mean that everyone has bad or unpleasant memory of someone's being treated unfairly?

    I see the definition. But after reading their example, I got confused.

    Thank you. TDOL. Wish you have a nice weekend.


    :D :D :D :D :D :D
    sabrina

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    Default Re: leave a bad taste in your mouth.

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Hello, dear teachers,

    leave a bad taste in your mouth. Don't get it.

    sabrina
    This idiom focuses on the lingering effect of unpleasantness. Some foods taste bad, but the bad taste go away quickly. Other foods leave a bad taste for a period of time. When this idiom is applied to things other than food, it is about the lingering bad taste.

    We had been dating for two months and I liked him very much. Monday night we went out and he became drunk and abusive. He has called me ten times since but I haven't returned his phone calls. His behavior on Monday left a bad taste in my mouth.

    Mike, Excellent example.

    Can I change the idiom a bit to "leave a good taste in my mouth"?
    (hehehe, I was just trying to play word game, but don't know if it makes sense in your language.)

    Noam Chomsky's incredible innovation of Transformational Rule helps ESL teachers better understand the complicated structure of grammar. His theory left a good taste in my mouth.


    sabrina

  6. #6
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    Default Re: leave a bad taste in your mouth.

    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Hello, dear teachers,

    leave a bad taste in your mouth. Don't get it.

    sabrina
    This idiom focuses on the lingering effect of unpleasantness. Some foods taste bad, but the bad taste go away quickly. Other foods leave a bad taste for a period of time. When this idiom is applied to things other than food, it is about the lingering bad taste.

    We had been dating for two months and I liked him very much. Monday night we went out and he became drunk and abusive. He has called me ten times since but I haven't returned his phone calls. His behavior on Monday left a bad taste in my mouth.

    Mike, Excellent example.

    Can I change the idiom a bit to "leave a good taste in my mouth"?
    (hehehe, I was just trying to play word game, but don't know if it makes sense in your language.)

    Noam Chomsky's incredible innovation of Transformational Rule helps ESL teachers better understand the complicated structure of grammar. His theory left a good taste in my mouth.


    sabrina
    You can say that as a form of irony. Use that only with people who understand the original idiom. :wink:

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