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  1. #1
    albertino is offline Senior Member
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    Default The proper use of "Besides"

    Most people use "besides(an adverb)" as an equivalent to "in addition to, moreover", as some grammar books say so.
    However, I was told that "besides" should not be used in this way, as it should be used in a negative dialogue and before a conclusive argument. For example,

    "Joan said Mary wanted to apply for the job of secretary. However, Peter sneered. He said Mary did not have any relevant qualifications. Besides, she did not know how to type and use a computer. "

    Am I right?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: The proper use of "Besides"

    HI Al

    The word "besides" has two usages.

    FIRST USAGE -This is a word highly used in spoken English, used when adding a stronger reason in addition to the reason already given:

    -I didn't go to see the move yesterday because I was feeling tired, besides I didn't have enough money.

    SECOND USAGE -"in addition to someone or something else that you are mentioning":

    -Who else was at the party yesterday, besides you and Anne?
    -What do you do when you are free, besides playing tennis?

    Cheers
    Udara
    Not a native and not a teacher

  3. #3
    albertino is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: The proper use of "Besides"

    Quote Originally Posted by udara sankalpa View Post
    HI Al

    The word "besides" has two usages.

    FIRST USAGE -This is a word highly used in spoken English, used when adding a stronger reason in addition to the reason already given:

    -I didn't go to see the move yesterday because I was feeling tired, besides I didn't have enough money.

    SECOND USAGE -"in addition to someone or something else that you are mentioning":

    -Who else was at the party yesterday, besides you and Anne?
    -What do you do when you are free, besides playing tennis?

    Cheers
    Udara
    Not a native and not a teacher
    Thanks for your reply, Udara.
    In your examples, "besides" in the first one is just what I mean an adverb, while in the second a preposition.
    But these days, people often use "besides" (adverb) as "in addtion and moreover", to add something further in the positive, for example, "John is a handsome boy. Besides, he has a heart of gold." That is what I think is wrong. Its proper usage should be the ones as given by you in the first example(i.e. in the negative sense).

    However, in the Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English, again, it seems to say otherwise:
    "I don't mind picking up your things from the store. Besides, the walk will do me good."
    "I wanted to help her out. Besides, I needed the money."

    I just wonder what the proper usage of "besides" really is.

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