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  1. #1
    ender is offline Newbie
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    hm, somewhat weird

    Hey you guys,
    Ive started reading a lot of English books recently and Im really baffled to find out (not just a few but rather a lot of) instances of what seems to be bad grammer, especially concerning the usage of Perfect Tenses, i.e. using the past tense of a verb instead of the past participle on one hand and omitting the personal ending in third person singular on other - (`I have went there`, `I have mistook her for her sister`, it dont matter anymore` etc.)
    Is that a trend of a sort in modern English? I dont feel like overlooking these thought, since Im not talking about just a single occurance, but rather a bunch of.
    Thanks in advance, Id really appreciate any opinion, especially by native speaker guys
    Last edited by ender; 02-Jul-2007 at 21:59.

  2. #2
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Re: hm, somewhat weird

    Welcome to the forums, ender.

    I think we really need to see specific examples of what you are asking about. There may well be a stylistic / literary reasons for these usages if you are meeting them in books.

  3. #3
    Teia is offline Key Member
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    Re: hm, somewhat weird

    Quote Originally Posted by ender View Post
    Hey you guys,
    Ive started reading a lot of English books recently and Im really baffled to find out (not just a few but rather a lot of) instances of what seems to be bad grammer, especially concerning the usage of Perfect Tenses, i.e. using the past tense of a verb instead of the past participle on one hand and omitting the personal ending in third person singular on other - (`I have went there`, `I have mistook her for her sister`, it dont matter anymore` etc.)
    Is that a trend of a sort in modern English? I dont feel like overlooking these thought, since Im not talking about just a single occurance, but rather a bunch of.
    Thanks in advance, Id really appreciate any opinion, especially by native speaker guys

    Hi Ender

    I`d like to ask you something : what kind of English books have you been reading lately , where are they printed and who are the authors ? Are they English natives?
    Another question might relate to what type of literature you read : narratives, grammar books, children`s stories, stories for teenagers..., etc.?
    You can encounter all sorts of slang, colloquial words, familiar expressions, dialectal phrases in many books no matter if it is about English language or any other language in the world .

    Regards
    Last edited by Teia; 02-Jul-2007 at 22:24.

  4. #4
    ender is offline Newbie
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    Re: hm, somewhat weird

    Well, its sort of embarrasing for me to open up and come out here , but Ive come across these while reading some of Mark Roeders books.
    As far as Im aware of this, hes definitely a native speaker and yes, they are all about teenagers, so I suppose it could turn out to be a slang or something. Ive just noticed these too often

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