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  1. RonBee's Avatar
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    #11
    The expression "to rock somebody" may or may not have sexual meaning. "RonBee rocks!" means that RonBee is a cool guy.

    :)

  2. eric2004
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    #12
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    The expression "to rock somebody" may or may not have sexual meaning. "RonBee rocks!" means that RonBee is a cool guy.

    :)
    Really? So it's the opposite of "RonBee sucks or stinks",right? :wink: Rock and suck are both verb.

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    #13
    In modern British English, 'rock' doesn't have a sexual connotaion that I know of.

  3. RonBee's Avatar
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    #14
    Quote Originally Posted by eric2004
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    The expression "to rock somebody" may or may not have sexual meaning. "RonBee rocks!" means that RonBee is a cool guy.

    :)
    Really? So it's the opposite of "RonBee sucks or stinks",right? :wink: Rock and suck are both verb.
    Yes, it would be the opposite of either of those. (Guess which I prefer.) As you can imagine, I would just as soon not see "RonBee stinks".

    :wink:

  4. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #15
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    In modern British English, 'rock' doesn't have a sexual connotaion that I know of.
    North American English
    To get one's rocks off (female or male usage) :)

  5. RonBee's Avatar
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    #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    In modern British English, 'rock' doesn't have a sexual connotaion that I know of.
    North American English
    To get one's rocks off (female or male usage) :)
    That removes all doubt.

    :wink:


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    #17
    I've ever read an email by a male friend. At the end of email, he added

    Rock on.

    I think it's just something you say to someone to rock your life, make your life full of joyfulness. Is that right?



    sabrina


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    #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    In modern British English, 'rock' doesn't have a sexual connotaion that I know of.
    North American English
    To get one's rocks off (female or male usage) :)
    From NTC's Dictionary
    To get one's rocks off (on something)
    meaning to enjoy something.
    I'm really getting my rocks off on heavy metal.

  6. RonBee's Avatar
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    #19
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    I've ever read an email by a male friend. At the end of email, he added

    Rock on.

    I think it's just something you say to someone to rock your life, make your life full of joyfulness. Is that right?



    sabrina
    My guess is that "Rock on" in that context means enjoy yourself or have a good time.

    I would say you've got it right.

    :)

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    #20
    'Get your rocks off' does also mean 'have sex'.

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