Results 1 to 4 of 4

    • Join Date: Jan 2007
    • Posts: 1,740
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    cordial relationship

    From childhood onwards, we(you and me) have cordial relationship and I hope it lasts till the end of our life.

    I am not sure whether I can use `cordial' to mean `friendly (close friendship and not formal one)' in this context.

    Please help me.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 17,675
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: cordial relationship

    Cordial has a distant feeling to it. If you say two people were cordial to each other, it means merely that they did not argue, not that they were close.

    Also, "relationship" (or "friendship" if you use that instead) requires an article. And since you are each your own person, I would use "lives" and not "life."

    Here is how I would write it:
    Since our childhood, we have had a close friendhip, and I hope it lasts throughout our lives.


    • Join Date: Jan 2007
    • Posts: 1,740
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: cordial relationship

    Thank you Barb_D

    I would like to frame some sentences with the word `cordial'. Please help me on these :

    (1) I can't ask for money help to Minu as we have just cordial relationship with each other.
    (2) The manager invited all the employees cordially for his marriage.

    Are these sentences grammatically/semantically correct?
    If yes, what the `cordial' exactly means in the above two sentences?

    I think, in the first sentence, the codial means `we are friends but not very close friends'. We do speak and spend time together but we don't share our emotions, feelings, etc. i.e. it is just formal.

    I think, in the second sentence, the `cordially' means `all the employees are invited formally by sending/giving a letter or an envelope which contains information about the marriage place, date, time, and welcome message to the recipient'.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 17,675
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: cordial relationship

    Use "cordial" to show the contrast with an unfriendly relationship with a lot of arguing, not as a contrast to a warm and friendly one.

    Try this: When Jim and Mary divorced, they maintained a cordial relationship, which has certainly made the situation easier for their children.

    Or this:
    A: I know that you and Debbie had a big fight last week. How was it when you were both at the same party last night?
    B: We were cordial to each other.

    While "you are cordially invited" is pretty standard thing to say, it's simply a fixed idiom to express politeness. I've never heard it used as "we were invited cordially."

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 12-May-2007, 09:58
  2. positional relationship across a plate
    By manky in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 31-Dec-2006, 18:36
  3. logical relationship
    By gilll in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 13-Nov-2006, 08:29
  4. relationship or relation?
    By bosun in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 15-Sep-2006, 06:04
  5. gift relationship?
    By bosunyum in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 19-Dec-2005, 05:48

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •