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Thread: As & Like

  1. Carlos1963
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    #1

    As & Like

    Hello:

    Please, could you explain me the difference between 'As' and 'Like'?

    Thank you


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    #2

    Re: As & Like

    I think you need to be more specific. Can you give some examples of their use that you find difficult?

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    #3

    Re: As & Like

    Quote Originally Posted by Carlos1963 View Post
    Hello:

    Please, could you explain me the difference between 'As' and 'Like'?

    Thank you

    Use like before a noun, as in 'She's very like her mother'. Where a clause follows, you should use as or as if, e.g. 'He's behaving as if he owns the place' (not 'like he owns'), or 'You don't know him as I do' (not 'like I do').
    We use As when we speak about an action. As you do.
    And we use Like when we speak about physical resemblance. She looks like her mother.
    Basically, if a subject and verb are to follow, use "as." If a single word follows, use "like."
    I am going to talk to you now as your father.... (in my role as your father);
    I am going to talk to you now like your father.... (in the same way as your father).

    "As" links a whole clause to the rest of the sentence and "like" links a noun or pronoun.

    The students thought that the professor was acting like a child.

    The students thought that the professor was acting as a child does.

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